The House that Kevin Built 2012 The Brighton Waste House

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Eco Open Houses 2015

The Waste House is open as part of the Eco Open House weekends Saturday and Sunday 17th – 18th and 24th – 25th October 1pm- 5pm.

This year Eco Open Houses takes place in Brighton & Hove over the two weekends.

The printed brochure, with maps and house details is available free at selected sites around Brighton and Hove, or as a downloadable pdf, found on their website.

What is Eco Open Houses?

Whether you are a home owner or tenant wanting to find out what you can do in your home to save money and feel healthier and warmer, a builder looking for better ways to build for your clients or just simply curious, come and be inspired by visiting an eco-home near you!

Some Eco Open Houses are old houses that have been retrofitted and improved, some have just been built. What they feature in common is being cheaper to run and requiring less mains energy to keep them warm.

It doesn't necessarily take expensive renovation to cut bills: behaviour changes and small alterations can make a big difference. Discover practical steps to reduce energy use, water use and carbon emissions in our own homes from the experiences of Eco Open Householders. Funding options to help you renovate your home are described in Ways to pay.



Waste House shortlisted for Stephen Lawrence Prize.

4 September 2015

The University of Brighton’s Waste House, Europe’s first permanent building made almost entirely from rubbish, has been shortlisted for the 2015 Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) Stephen Lawrence Prize.

The award, funded by the Marco Goldschmied Foundation, was set up in memory of the teenager who was on the way to becoming an architect when he was murdered in 1993

The prize, which rewards the best examples of projects that have a construction budget of less than £1m, is intended to encourage fresh talent working with smaller budgets.

The Waste House, opened last year in the grounds of the university’s campus in Grand Parade, Brighton, was a collaborative project constructed by over 365 design and construction students using nearly 90 per cent of material that otherwise would have been thrown away.

Materials included old toothbrushes, carpet tiles, denim jeans, cycle inner tubes, video tapes, and DVDs as well as discarded bricks and wood. Design students from the university, as well as construction students from City College Brighton & Hove, were joined by apprentices from The Mears Group to construct this unique thought provoking and influential project.

Duncan Baker-Brown, university Senior Lecturer and the Waste House architect, said: “The shortlisting for such a prestigious national award alone is a tremendous accolade and one that recognises the hard work and dedication that has gone into the project by a great many volunteers, staff, students, partners and supporters.

“It highlights how low-carbon homes can be built in a cost-effective way using waste, including surplus material from building sites – the construction industry discards 20 per cent of everything it uses, the equivalent of scrapping one in five houses built. The building which houses the university’s MA in Sustainable Design, is a ‘live’ research project in itself and welcomes community groups.

Duncan Baker-Brown said the building literally locks in waste rather having it burnt, buried into landfill sites or dumped in the ocean.

He said: “The house has attracted huge interest nationally and globally and I am sure lessons learned from the project can be adopted by the construction industry to reduce waste, cut carbon emissions and to help combat global warming.

“Reusing waste saves money for big business as well as small, and it relieves pressure on our planet. There really is no such thing as waste or surplus material – it is just stuff in the wrong place – and reusing it saves the environment by reducing the need to mine so much raw material in the first place.”

The Waste House already has collected several awards including a RIBA South East Regional Award design honour and RIBA’s sustainability award in 2014. The winner of the Stephen Lawrence award will be announced on 15 October at RIBA’s London headquarters.

For more information about the nomination visit:

https://www.architecture.com/StirlingPrize/Awards2015/StephenLawrencePrize/RIBAStephenLawrencePrize2015.aspx
 
http://www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/riba-reveals-2015-stephen-lawrence-prize-shortlist/8688405.article


Stirling Prize Award Regional Winners

RIBA award winnerCopy taken from architecture.com

ARCHITECT:BBM SUSTAINABLE DESIGN LTD

CLIENT: COLLEGE OF ARTS & HUMANITIES UNIVERSITY OF BRIGHTON

AWARDS WON: RIBA SOUTH EAST AWARD 2015

RIBA SOUTH EAST SUSTAINABILITY AWARD 2015 - SPONSORED BY SIKA

From a distance this looks like an ordinary contemporary town house. However when one gets nearer and sees carpet tiles used as wall cladding, it becomes clear this is a project with an interesting agenda. More than a space to live, work and play in, the house is a collective of experiments in which students learn by application the ways whereby recycled materials can be used in construction.

Although not immediately obvious, the design process and personal stories behind each wall, piece of furniture and light fitting are simply fascinating. It is a project that will never be fully resolved, will have a continually evolving brief and will always be full of activity, thanks to a dedicated team of supporters. Some of the experiments are extraordinary: from old toothbrushes used as insulation to old carpet tiles used as rain-screen cladding. This project cleverly breathes new life into objects and materials that would normally be discarded.

The Brighton Waste House has sufficient scientific integrity to be taken seriously by the construction industry and just enough political clout to influence recycling policy. It is clear this interesting project will continue to question important issues of recycling that affect everyone.

CONTRACTOR: THE MEARS GROUP

CONSULTANT: BBP CONSULTING ENGINEERS

CONSULTANT: ROBINSON ASSOCIATES ENGINEERS

COST: £200,000


Downing Street award for recycling "goddess"

23 February 2015

Cat Fletcher, the “resource goddess” behind the University of Brighton’s Waste House, today was named by the Prime Minister as one of Britain’s top volunteers.

Cat, university volunteer, Reuse Manager for Brighton and Hove City Council and co-founder of FREEGLE, the UK’s largest online reuse network, received the daily ‘Points of Light’ award which recognises outstanding individual volunteers, “people who are making a change in their community”.

The award was developed in partnership with the Points of Light programme in America, established by President George H W Bush, and supported by President Barack Obama.

Downing Street said: “Cat is one of the founders of Freegle,a free sharing network that allows people to reuse unwanted goods. Launched in 2009, it now has more than 1.9 million members in over 400 community groups across the UK. Cat now runs Freegle Brighton and has saved thousands of tonnes of useful but unwanted goods from landfill, donating them to charities, social enterprises and good causes in her area.”

Cat, whose CV is headed “Resource Goddess”, said she was thrilled with the award: “I’m really pleased but a lot of other people can take a bow today. FREEGLE’s and the university Waste House successes wouldn’t have been possible without an army of helpers and I’d like to think this award reflects just as much on their hard work and dedication.” The Waste House, in the grounds of the university’s campus at the College of Arts and Humanities in Grand Parade, Brighton, is Britain’s first house made almost entirely of rubbish including 20,000 toothbrushes, two tonnes of denim jeans, 4,000 DVD cases, 2,000 floppy discs, 2,000 used carpet tiles, construction waste and surplus material.

The House, open to the public, is a ‘live' ongoing research project and permanent new design workshop focused on enabling open discussion and understanding of sustainable development.

Professor Julian Crampton, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Brighton, said: “This award is richly deserved and we offer Cat our warmest congratulations.

“Cat has been a main driving force behind sourcing thrown-away and surplus materials for the Waste House project. In doing so, Cat has demonstrated how so-called rubbish can be put to good use. The House mirrors work going on throughout the university with its commitment to cutting energy consumption and emissions, increasing recycling and ensuring that sustainable development and procurement are embedded in all our practices.”

Professor Anne Boddington, Dean of the university’s College of Arts & Humanities, said: “We are delighted that Cat’s expertise and significant contribution to sustainability, waste management and to working with and within communities is being recognised by this prestigious award. Cat has helped propel the university’s Waste House onto the world stage and now students, politicians, the housing industry, and indeed countries around the globe, are learning from the project as a way of helping tackle climate change.”

Duncan Baker-Brown: "This latest award acknowledges Cat's huge energy, enthusiasm and commitment to working with our local community groups, schools and colleges, as well as with our own students here at the University of Brighton. Cat's knowledge around issues of re-using waste material is, in my opinion, unmatched. Her knowledge was invaluable in helping the university deliver the Brighton Waste House, Europe's first permanent public building made of material others had discarded.


Key Speaker at Public Policy Exchange

4 December 2014 

Duncan Baker-Brown will be the key speaker at the Unlocking Value from Household Waste: Creating Resources and Wealth form Reused Materials at the Public Policy Exchange. 

The event will take place on 3 March 2015 at Broadwasy House, Westminster. 

Public Policy Exchange, holds regular interactive seminars which provide an invaluable interface for policy discussion, debate and networking.

These special events offer local practitioners, civil servants and other stakeholders not only an insight into current policy thinking, but also the opportunity to feed into future policy development across all areas of public policy.

Their speakers are unrivalled in calibre, ranging from Government Ministers and Senior Whitehall Officials to leading Local Authority figures and Voluntary Sector representatives. 

The Unlocking Value from Household Waste symposium will:

  • Discuss the recommendations highlighted in the LGA’s ‘Routes to reuse: maximising value from reused materials’ report
  • Consider the role of councils, reuse partners and national Government in creating an environment where reuse organisations have better access to a sufficient supply of products for reuse
  • Assess the economic, social, environmental and other benefits for taxpayers, consumers, companies and the third sector from an expanded reuse market


First class award for Waste House

2 December 2014

Brighton Waste House


The University of Brighton’s Waste House has scooped another top award.

People Environment & Achievement (PEA) presented its ‘Best Echo Project Working with Schools’ award to the project and its architect, lecturer Duncan Baker-Brown.

School children helped fill cavity walls with thrown away insulation materials, and schools and colleges regularly visit what is Britain’s first house made almost entirely of rubbish, at the university’s Grand Parade campus.

Another award went to Cat Fletcher, founder of FREEGLE, the UK’s biggest online reuse network, who sourced much of the Waste House materials. She collected the Campaigner Hero award.

The PEA awards recognise “inspirational people who making a difference to the green agenda”. They were created by ethical business and lifestyle consultant Jarvis Smith in conjunction with the green magazine PQ which he founded.

The project has now won five awards: October 2013 – Brighton Argus Achievement Awards Green Project of the Year; July 2014 – 2degrees Sustainability Champions Waste & Resource Management Project of the Year, and 2degrees Sustainability Champions Building of the Year; and October 2104 – Brighton Argus Community Stars Awards Green Project of the Year.

The Waste House has also been Highly Commended for The Blueprint Awards’ Best Sustainable Project, a worldwide award, and it was a finalist for The Climate Week Awards Best Education Project in March 2014.

Duncan Baker-Brown said: “This is an amazing achievement and reflects a tremendous amount of hard work and commitment by many people, university staff and volunteers, students, The Mears Group and many contributing companies and organisations.”


2degrees winners

10 June 2014

winners of the 2degrees awards for Waste & Resource Management and Building or Property Project

The Bighton Waste House won two awards at the 2degrees Champions Awards 2014, for Waste & Resource Management and Building or Property Project.

Find out more:

Waste & Resource Management

Building or Property Project

 2degree awards


Timelapse June 2013 - May 2014


A taste of Widening Participation at the Waste House


The Waste HOUSE 2014, a work of art

18 March 2014

Salt Field - by Phillip Hall-Patch 

 

In the lead up to the Brighton Festival the Waste House will be handed over to HOUSE 2014 artist and architect, Phillip Hall-Patch, to create an installation titled Salt Field.

Hall-Patch, who investigates the tensions between transience and stability through ephemeral and time-based works, is producing an installation that will look at the global historic and economic role of salt. The work will comprise of a ‘field’ of salt blocks drip-fed by water that will slowly dissolves, with the displaced mineral reforming as new crystalline growths.

Hall-Patch’s work is in response to HOUSE 2014’s lead artist, Yinka Shonibare MBE, themes of immigration, migration and refuge, in his work The British Library, that will be presented in the dramatic Edwardian surroundings of the former Reference Library in Brighton Museum and Art Gallery.

The other artists selected to produce work for HOUSE 2014, are Leah Gordon, Tobias Revell and Ester Svensson & Rosanna Martin.

You can see Phillip Hall-Patch’s Salt Field at the Brighton Waste House during the Brighton Festival, 3–25 May.

HOUSE 2014 is supported using public funding by the National Lottery through Arts Council England.

HOUSE 2014 Brighton Festval 


Climate Week

5 March 2014

Climate week award invite 

The Waste House project was one of four finalists in the best education or campaign category of the 2014 Climate Week Awards.

The annual awards showcase for outstanding initiatives from around the UK that are working towards a more sustainable future. The Waste House was represented at the awards ceremony held at Ecobuild in London on 4 March by Michael Buckman (City College), David Pendegrass (Mears), Jason Reeves (apprentice), Louise Fisher (architecture student) and Cat Fletcher (Freegle/University of Brighton). Greg Barker (MP for Energy and Climate Change) congratulated all the finalists on their exemplary work.


Countdown to completion

4 March 2014

The last two months have seen the Waste House busier than ever as we progress towards completion at the end of April. The big challenge has been holding onto the original ethos of this project: ‘there is no such thing as waste, just stuff in the wrong place!” We have had to consider very carefully how to wire and plumb the building to twenty-first century standards of safety and energy efficiency.

We consequently accepted that it was essential to install brand new electrical wiring and plumbing; it is just not possible to use second-hand wiring for a public building, and second-hand waste pipes are a health hazard nobody should risk.

2nd hand new kitchen  

So the last few months have relied on the generosity of a number of companies who have donated their material for nothing and I would like to take this opportunity to thank the following for their invaluable support: 

Jason Barns of City Electrical Factors (Brighton East Branch) for supplying all “first fix” wiring, socket & switch plates.

Andrew Cobham of CNC Ltd who supplied all CAT 6 communication systems.

Colin Chadwick of Sovereign Alarms who supplied the fire alarm system.

Keith Goodman of AM Fire & Security who supplied the Access & Security System, and finally

Ian Mitchel & Sara MacLean of Vent-Axia Group who supplied the Mechanical Ventilation & Heat Recovery unit (second-hand - YES!) that will ensure our all-electric house runs on the minimum of mains power.

Now that’s quite a list for two months work, but I’m not finished yet. All the above were installed to a greater extent by Electrical Tutor Simon Coode of City College Brighton and Hove with his electrician students. So very well done to them. We also relied heavily on Del Wynn (University of Brighton Systems Manager) to help organise first fix comms on site.

Dr. Kenneth Ip and his colleague from the Faculty of Science & Engineering have installed their wireless monitors into the walls of the Waste House so that they can monitor whether a wall is performing properly or not. There will be more about this.

Schools to visit the Waste House - Central Sussex College, Lewes New School 

The Waste House has continued to welcome visits from schools from the surrounding region including Central Sussex College, Lewes New School, Annan Farm and others.

In December the construction site inspired undergraduate Architecture students to design and make installations from ‘waste’ material generated by the Waste House.

I also just wanted to say a huge thank you to the core staff from Mears who turn up on site every day and get on with all the work that is required to make sure the Waste House is ready for City College plumbers and electricians and of course ready to hand over. So thank you to David Pendegrass, Jason, Fionn and Sam, and congratulations to Ty who has just been accepted into City College to complete a CAA Diploma Level 1.

And finally thank you to FREEGLE’s Cat Fletcher who has been busy securing second-hand fittings & material for us. More of that in the next bulletin.

In the fianl stages, the Waste House

 


Patcham High School Design and Technology Trip

15 January 2014

As part of the Widening Participation Scheme through the University of Brighton; a group of 13 Year 10 students from Patcham High School were taken by Mrs Mansfield and Mr McIntyre on a trip to The University of Brighton, Faculty of Arts in Grand Parade to visit the Waste House.

You can read more about the trip on thier website. 


Standing In

28 November 2013

6 months on being on site, Project leader, Duncan Baker-Brown, takes us around the Waste House highligting what it has been made out of.

Film produced by Kurt Rademeyer


The story of the Apprentice

21 November 2013

This update focuses on Mears Group Carpentry Apprentice Jason Reeves, as he clocks up 400 hours working on the Waste House site. He started the project when he was a voluenteer from Brighton and Hove City college.

Film produced by Kurt Rademeyer


1 November Update

1 November 2013

We have been super busy at the Waste House over the last month or so and the building is now watertight and topped out. This has only been possible because of the continued hard work of our site agent David Pendegrass of Mears, together with City College students & tutors, Mears apprentices and some dedicated volunteers including 15 year old Tye.

City College students 

After a steady drible of old toothbrushes over the last four months or so FREEGLE's Cat Fletcher hit on a huge source via Gatwick Airport. Cat discovered that toothbrushes are given away to every business class & first class passenger flying from Gatwick and all other airports. Therefore there are millions of toothbrushes collected and thrown away after only one use. We took delivery of just over 20,000 of them in one hit and filled 1.5 of our wall cassettes just like that! The toothbrushes were kindly collected, diverted from the waste stream and delivered to us by MNH Sustainable Cabin Services, SPECIALIST SUPPLY CHAIN SOLUTIONS FOR THE TRAVEL SECTOR. Georgina Jackson (account manager) is the person who made this happen at MNH Sustainable Cabin Services.

Gatwick Airport Toothbrushes 

Cat also found a steady supply of old vinyl banners that tend to be date sensitive and are therefore only used once. They could be recycled if the brass eyelets that are used to tie them to street lights during arts festivals (etc) were removed. They aren't so the banners go to landfill. Cat rescued 1000 of them and we have been able to use them as internal vapour control layers. They are very jolly as you can see. but unfortunately they won't be seen as they will be buries behind the internal wall finishes. We also used them as damp proof courses (dpc's to those in the know) around our lovely Rationel windows. The banners have been kindly collected, diverted from the waste stream and delivered to us by Bay Media. Bruce Bignell is the account manager at Bay who has championed this partnership.

old vinyl banners as internal vapour control layers 

Lots of companies have been supplying The Waste House with their innovative green products as well. So the Waste House team would like to thank the following companies for their generous support:

Thank you to AAC Waterproofing ltd supplied and installed their amazing Prelasti rubber membrane roof finish made from up to 40% waste rubber and other material from car tyres. Mears Apprentices & City College carpentry students worked very hard in difficult weather conditions to make sure the ply roof decking was ready for the roofers.

AAC Waterproofing ltd - Prelasti rubber membrane 

Thank you to The Brighton & Hove Wood Recycling Project who continue to supply us with second hand timber on the occasions our FREEGLE suppliers run dry.

Thank you to Phil Barnard of Chandlers Sustainable Building Solutions for supplying us with surplus Porotherm Clay Blocks. We have installed some of them in the exposed vaulted ceiling on the first floor. The rest form one of the internal walls downstairs. Chandlers kindly facilitated a demonstration workshop for City College bricklayers who then installed these unusual thin jointed blocks for us.

Thank you to Dupont Building Innovations for supplying us with their Tyvek® Vapour Control & Building Membranes for the external walls of the Waste House. These are highly specialist membranes that are commonly used in low energy timber frame construction projects to control the flow of condensation through the fabric of the the building.

Tyvec Vapour Control & Building Membranes for the external walls 

Thank you to Ejot UK ltd who kindly supplied us with specialists long screw fixings for securing our external wall & roof insulation. They are also supplying us with the fixing system for the Photovoltaic Solar panels that will be arriving on site in the next couple of weeks.

Thank you to Kingspan UK who very generously supplied us with surplus and slightly damaged external wall and roof insulation that would normally be sold off cheaply to farmers to insulate their barns or reprocessed back at Kingspan factories.

surplus and slightly damaged external wall and roof insulation 

..... and last but definitely not least thank you to The Velux Company Ltd  who supplied us with three as yet not on the market amazing triple glazed INTEGRA roof lights whIch give 20% more natural light than previous roof lights of the same size and also come with external and internal automatic blinds.

 triple glazed INTEGRA roof lights 

Waste House 1 November 2013

Now that is quite a list. Next the electrics, plumbing and whole house ventilation and heat recovery!! Phew

DBB


Architecture lecturer to talk at TEDxBrighton

23 October 2013

Architecture lecturer Duncan Baker-BrownAre buildings made from old toothbrushes the future? Should architects look to create more buildings out of waste matter rather than materials that damage the environment?

Duncan Baker-Brown, lecturer, researcher and the architect behind a unique project to build the University of Brighton's Waste House, will call for a more ethical approach to building when he speaks at a TEDxBrighton event on Friday 25th October.

In his talk, Does architecture matter?, Duncan will criticise governments around the world, including the UK, for encouraging people to "burn their way out of recession" by their reliance on rapidly-depleting fossil fuels for economic growth.

He will say that power requires responsibility and that architects not only have a responsibility to design great buildings but to consider the possible negative consequences of the associated materials and construction systems they specify, and the energy consumption involved in the design, construction, use and demolition of buildings.

He will ask: "Is it correct or sensible even to continue to specify these materials when there are millions of tonnes of discarded 'waste' that could potentially take the place of newly-mined raw materials?"

The TEDxBrighton talk will be streamed live at http://tedxbrighton.com.

Duncan recently won the Green Person award for The Brighton Waste House at The Argus Achievement Awards. The house is built almost entirely of waste materials including thrown-away bricks, ply sheets and wood, plus old toothbrushes.

The inspiration for the Waste House was a house Duncan designed and constructed with Grand Designs presenter Kevin McCloud, called The House That Kevin Built. It was made almost entirely of compostable materials such as straw, reeds, timber and hemp. It was built live on Channel 4's Grand Designs Live over six consecutive days, attracting over five million viewers a night.

The Brighton Waste House, which is due to be completed in February and will be one of the first A energy-efficient rated buildings in the UK, is being built in the grounds of the Faculty of Arts campus at Grand Parade.

Duncan helped to galvanise community groups, businesses, academics, schools and environmental groups to lend their support to the project. He has been at the forefront of sustainable design for over 20 years since he designed and built the RIBA Competition winning scheme 'the house of the Future' with partner Ian McKay in 1994. In 1997, as Co-Director of BBM, Duncan was part of the design team which won the competition to design The Greenwich Millennium Village in London. Since then he has practiced, researched and taught around issues of sustainable design and development.

Pass it on TEDxBrighton

TEDxBrighton is an independently licensed TED event.


Green Award for Waste House Project

7 October 2013

University of Brighton Faculty of Arts lecturer Duncan Baker-Brown collect Argus Green Award


University of Brighton Faculty of Arts lecturer and researcher Duncan Baker Brown’s pioneering project to build a house out of waste has won an environmental award at the annual Argus Achievement Awards.

Duncan who is a lecturer and researcher in architecture, won the Green Person award, sponsored by Southern Water, for The Brighton Waste House. The house is built almost entirely of waste materials including thrown-away bricks, ply sheets and wood plus old toothbrushes.

The 20 Argus Achievement Awards, presented by newsreader Nicholas Owen, were handed out at a gala event at Theatre Royal in Brighton on 6 October.

The inspiration for the Waste House was a house Duncan designed and constructed with Grand Designs presenter Kevin McCloud, called 'The House that Kevin Built’. This sustainable building made almost entirely of compostable materials such as straw, reeds, timber and hemp was built live on Channel 4’s Grand Designs Live over six consecutive days, attracting over five million viewers a night.

The Brighton Waste House, which is due to be completed in February, is being built in the grounds of the Faculty of Arts campus at Grand Parade.

Duncan helped to galvanize community groups, business groups, academics, schools and environmental groups to lend their support to the project.

He said: “This is an award for everyone who has worked on the project. The construction industry discards 20 per cent of everything it uses, the equivalent of scrapping one in five houses built. Our aim is to show how low-carbon homes can be built cheaply and quickly using waste including surplus material from building sites.

"This research will inform developments in the construction industry and in the design of houses of the future. Businesses can't afford to keep throwing stuff away and those who start reusing waste will be more likely to survive in the ever-tougher commercial marketplace."

The scheme is backed by Kevin McCloud and is being supported by Brighton &Hove City Council, a host of companies and internet-based reuse organisation, Freegle. Collaborators include the Mears Group, City College Brighton and Hove, South Downs Solar, Rational Windows & Doors, Velfac, DuPont, Ejot among others.

The Waste House has been constructed with the help of over 300 students and volunteers from the Faculty of Arts and City College Brighton and Hove.

The house, which will be one of the first A* energy-efficient rated buildings in the UK, will showcase new technologies and will be used as an exhibition and workshop space by local community groups and as the University of Brighton's headquarters for sustainable design.

Michael Beard, editor of The Argus said: “The Argus Achievement Awards are quite simply one of the best things that The Argus is involved in.

"It’s so important to celebrate and recognise everything that’s good in our community and give back to those people who selflessly give up many hours of their time without much, if any, recognition.

“The fact that we had a record number of nominations this year shows that it’s growing in popularity which we’re absolutely delighted about.”

 


Topping Out

2 September 2013

We are getting near to the ‘topping out’ stage with our project (In building construction, topping out is when the last beam is placed at the top of a building). Here is a short time lapse film showing the development of the Brighton Waste House over the past year.

Here are some shots from site today, as we get closer to ‘topping out’.

Apprentices working on the roof.

Looking up at the roof structure  


Preview Clip 5 - Summer Camp

2 September 2013

“It’s the first time for me using some of this equipment.”

Mears apprentices, Max Lucas and Reece Baker, talk about their experiences so far of working on the Brighton Waste House, and how the project is already benefiting their future in the construction industry.

Film produced by Kurt Rademeyer


Preview Clip 4 – The Volunteer Camp

27 August 2013

Thinking differently and Learning from one another.

In our latest video from the Brighton Waste House building site, Mears Project Manager, David Pendegrass, talks about the mix and blend of the College of Arts and Humanities and City College Brighton and Hove students working on the Waste House, and how sharing their different thinking and approaches to the challenges they face are making them all the more complete craftsperson.

David also talks about how College of Arts and Humanities, Architects students will be able to continue volunteering on the Waste House throughout the year to bolster their industry experience, and that 5 young people have worked their way up to a paid Mears carpentry apprenticeship.

Film produced by Kurt Rademeyer


Summer Update

7 August 2013

Mears apprentices working on the roof

Due to the huge amount of work carried out by our amazing Summer School Volunteer Camp the Waste House team are taking a well earned break until 12 August.

The Summer Camp has had over 50 volunteers working on site since the end of June, comprising 21 students from City College Brighton and Hove, 26 from the Faculty of Art and three members of the public. So a huge 'thank you' is due to all who have helped and are keeping the works going while the academic institutions are closed for the summer. I would also like to thank David Pendegrass & Mr.Dee, both from Mears, for coordinating this, and congratulate the five City College Carpentry students who have started their Mears Apprenticeship Programme while working on the Waste House.

City College Brighton and Hove Students 

On 17 July we welcomed 70 pupils from St. Andrews C&E School to site. They arrived armed with toothbrushes to contribute to the insulation for one of the wall 'cassettes'. They were joined by Dr. Caroline Lucas MP and a film crew from ITV. You can see their report, and others, in our Press Coverage page here.

On 26 July we received damaged and returned external wall and roof insulation from Kingspan. This material is 'proper' insulation used in constructing well insulated twenty-first century buildings. Kingspan collect the damaged and surplus material from building sites and resell it to farmers for insulating cowsheds or it is sold for packaging. We will use it to provide external wall and roof insulation in addition to the tooth brushes, video tapes etc already installed. It will give us the correct levels of insulation to pass Building Regulations Approval. The non-conventional insulation materials provide additional insulation beyond this benchmark.

Finally, our Chief Scavenger Cat Fletcher of Freegle has won another award. She recently returned from San Francisco, where together with James Togut, won a Global Award for social innovation in the Living Labs / Cities Pilot the Future competition. The LLGA is an opportunity for people from around the world to create solutions for real life problems presented by over 20 cities. The cities then facilitate the winning urban and social innovators to pilot their solutions. James and Cat’s winning solution ‘CityMakers' is an online platform and street level programme that accelerates resourcefulness by connecting and measuring untapped skills, goods, events, people and initiatives in any community. You can watch a video about it here. So well done Cat.

Film produced by Kurt Rademeyer


Don't throw your old toothbrush away

18 July 2013

Group of school children with old toothbrushes

Schoolchildren brought along their old toothbrushes to help build Britain's first house made almost entirely from thrown-away waste.

Pupils from St Andrew’s CE Primary School in Hove were joined by Brighton MP Caroline Lucas as they slotted brushes into wall cavities to help with insulation in the house which is under construction at the University of Brighton’s Faculty of Arts campus in Grand Parade, Brighton.

The project is being backed by TV designer and presenter Kevin McCloud who, with University of Brighton lecturer and architect Duncan Baker-Brown, worked on a similar build in London for a TV programme in 2008.

With support from Brighton and Hove City Council, City College, the Mears Group, a host of companies and the internet-based reuse organisation Freegle, Mr Baker-Brown is using thrown-away bricks, ply sheets, wood and “rubbish” including old plastic razors, denim jeans, DVD’s and video cassettes to show how low-carbon homes can be built cheaply and quickly.

Students, apprentices, local builders and school children have been involved with the making of the structure, with the ambition to train students and apprentices around emerging green industries.

Mr Baker-Brown said: “The research will inform developments in the construction industry and will help in the design of houses of the future. The building will have its own street entrance – putting the house at the heart of the community.

“Reusing waste saves money for big business as well as small, and it relieves pressure on our planet. There really is no such thing as waste or surplus material – it is just stuff in the wrong place.”

David Pendegrass, Project Manager with Mears, said: “We’ll be testing the toothbrushes and other thrown away items for their insulation qualities. We’re also testing chalk – a lorry-load was heading for a landfill site but we diverted it here, mixed it with water, compacted it and, so far, it has proved a great insulating material.”

Caroline Lucas said: “So many people are involved and helping with the project – it is wonderful to see. And it shows there are lessons for us all about recycling. So much gets thrown away that can be re-used.”

Cat Fletcher who runs Freegle which promotes keeping usable items out of landfill, has been sourcing recycling material, including toothbrushes. She said: “Every toothbrush made still exists in landfill sites, apart from those burnt in incinerators. But we are collecting them locally to use in the House project. Most plastics are unrecyclable because the UK does not have local infrastructure or systems in place to collect and separate all the different types of plastic that stuff is made from.

“We want people to bring old toothbrushes to the site and also old bicycle tyre inner tubes.”

Toothbrushes and bicycle inner tubes can be dropped off to The Waste House building site on the corner of Grand Parade Mews and William Street Brighton BN2 2RU (Monday to Friday 9am -3pm) or they can be put through the gate anytime.

There are two other collection sites: Emmaus Brighton, Drove Rd, Portslade, BN41 2PA (Tuesday to Saturday 10am-5pm)

www.emmausbrighton.co.uk and The Green Centre, 39 Manor Hill, Whitehawk, Brighton, BN2 5EL, in boxes outside at anytime.

www.thegreencentre.co.uk


CityMakers

July 2013

Local social entrepreneurs James Togut and Cat Fletcher recently returned from San Francisco, where they won a Global Award for social innovation in the Living Labs | Cities Pilot the Future competition. The LLGA is an opportunity for people from around the world to create solutions for real life problems aspresented by over 20 cities. The cities then facilitate the winning urban & social innovators to pilot their solutions.

James and Cat’s winning solution “CityMakers” is an online platform and street level programme that accelerates resourcefulness by connecting and measuring untapped skills, goods, events, people  andinitiatives in any community.

The premise being, that if we could better organise and thus match up needs with fulfilments, then better use would be made of existing material and human resources and build citizen resilience along the way.

James is the chief imagination officer of The Sunshine Bank, a Brighton based CIC (Community Interest Company) developing a rewards system to recognise and celebrate the ‘good’ done by citizens. Cat is an Environmental Rep for the Community and Voluntary Sector Forum in Brighton and Hove, is a founding member of Freegle UK, has voluntarily run Green Cycle Sussex (free online reuse service) for the city for 6 years and for the past year has been a collaborator on the University of Brighton’s Faculty of Arts  “Waste House” project.

They combine the desire to amplify the good done by anyone in a community and to make better use of all our existing resources.

James and Cat’s winning idea “CityMakers” was shortlisted for problems in both Rosario in Argentina and for Terrassa just outside Barcelona in Spain. A rigorous judging panel (each city nominates a jury of 5-10 local and international experts, to evaluate entries against the criteria of relevance, innovation and the impact on economy, politics, ecology and culture) chose CityMakers in answer to Terrassa’s problem of how to enable citizens to be resilient in the face of economic and social hardship - as faced by so many in cities around the world. To this end James and Cat developed a unique online platform, business plan and 12 month pilot programme accompanied by a video for this final selection process in partnership with Finnish IT company

CityMakers Video for Living Labs Global Awards 2013

CityMakers from CityMakers on Vimeo.

More information about the Awards


Wanted: Your old toothbrushes and bicycle inner tubes!

The Waste House team need your old toothbrushes and bicycle inner tubes to use in the construction of the Waste House. You can donate them at any of the three convenient drop off points

Brighton Waste House: Corner of Grand Parade Mews & William Street, Brighton BN2 2RU.  Monday to Friday  9-3 or pop through gate 24/7

Emmaus Brighton: The Drove, Portslade,BN41 2PATuesday to Saturday 10-5

The Green Centre: 39 Manor Hill, Whitehawk 24/7 collection boxes outside

For more info contact Cat Fletcher on 07962 449573 or email brightonwastehouse@gmail.com


Cladding Competition

The Waste House Team have launched a competition for any member of the public or university -  Tweet @WasteHouse your ideas for waste or surplus material that we could use to clad the external walls of the Waste House


The Rammed Earth Wall

10 tonnes of chalk waste and 10% of clay makes the rammed earth wall, with the help from a compressor and pneumatic rammer.

Rammed earth can contribute to the overall energy-efficiency of buildings. The density, thickness and thermal conductivity of rammed earth make it a particularly suitable material for passive solar heating. Warmth takes almost 12 hours to work its way through a wall 35 cm thick.


Summer Camp

June 12th was probably the busiest day on site so far ... students from City College were installing the final first floor beams made from waste ply and timber. We also have Rowland Keeble of Rammed Earth Consulting CIC for three days. He is helping architecture & carpentry volunteer students (together with very able ground works apprentices from Mears) how to construct the rammed chalk wall in the stair well of the Waste House. Well done to all volunteers. We had about 40 students working in shifts all day. Towards the end of the day we welcomed year 12 pupils from Brighton College School's Green Group. They came to see the Waste House and also to catch the last moments of the Graduation Show. 

And finally, we unveiled our stunning Waste House hoarding to the public last week. Thank you to Studio Cuthbert for the graphic design and Signs Express Crawley(www.signsexpress.co.uk/branch/57/crawley/‎) for the printed artwork. 

Work on site


Duncan Baker-Brown reports on progress with the roof joists and chalk

On Thursday 16th May I met with James Chalmers (www.chalmersandco.co.uk) a local building contractor with whom I have constructed many low carbon developments. James had large joists in his yard, salvaged from a house demolished in Brighton last year, which he has kindly donated and will be used to construct the Waste House roof trusses. 

While I was loading the timber with James onto his trailer I casually asked him if he had ten tonnes of chalk anywhere. Well, by coincidence he did! He had an active building site from which chalk was being removed and sent to landfill the very next day ... perfect for our rammed chalk wall. We have been looking all over Sussex for two months, so this was a result. Within twenty-two hours of that casual chat the chalk arrived at the Waste House site. Thank you to James Chalmers for the chalk and timber and thank you to David Pendegrass of Mears, our site agent, for making the site ready for this delivery at hardly any notice. 


The build gets under way

November 2012: Caroline Lucas, MP, opens the 'waste house phase of the build.

Caroline Lucas, Brighton's Green MP, cemented a brick at the commencement of work. She said: "When you describe this project to people they don't believe it can possibly withstand the wind, the rain and the elements but what they are going to demonstrate is that it certainly can...This [project] is good for creating jobs and good for the environment."

November 2012: As our build of the 'Waste House' begins in earnest, we can thank the enormous support we've had in what is a genuinely community-wide project.

In particular we would like to say thank you to Mears who have believed in this project and been behind it from the start. Mears have very kindly offered to manage the entire build project; supervising and securing the site, providing health and safety and site induction for everyone working on the site, transportation and lots more. And, they’re providing all this for free!

As the project has progressed they have been joined by: City College Brighton and Hove, whose students will be creating the wooden frame and cassettes that make up the structure of the building; South Downs Solar who are giving us a state of the art photovoltaic roof to generate the electricity required and Westgate Joinery who are providing external doors and windows that are the very latest in triple-glazed, highly insulating technology.

We estimate that the generous donations of time, expertise, manpower and technology will be worth nearly £200,000 to the university and we would not be able to complete this project without their help.

In addition to the supporters above we are working with a number of organisations whose help is invaluable. These include Freegle, who will be helping us to source the materials needed for the build from developments around the city, and Work This Way, part of the Prisoners' Education Trust, that will help with aspects of the build and the transportation of materials to the site. 


Archive News

July/August 2013

Duncan Baker-Brown's call for new materials 

Brighton Waste House

 

May 2013

 Cladding Competition

On Friday 31st May, at The Faculty of Arts Graduation Show, the Waste House Team are launching a competition for anybody who wants to be involved to Tweet @WasteHouse their ideas for waste or surplus material that we could use to clad the external walls of the Waste House. 

Duncan Baker-Brown reports on progress with the roof joists and chalk

On Thursday 16th May I met with James Chalmers (www.chalmersandco.co.uk) a local building contractor with whom I have constructed many low carbon developments. James had large joists in his yard, salvaged from a house demolished in Brighton last year, which he has kindly donated and will be used to construct the Waste House roof trusses. 

While I was loading the timber with James onto his trailer I casually asked him if he had ten tonnes of chalk anywhere. Well, by coincidence he did! He had an active building site from which chalk was being removed and sent to landfill the very next day ... perfect for our rammed chalk wall. We have been looking all over Sussex for two months, so this was a result. Within twenty-two hours of that casual chat the chalk arrived at the Waste House site. Thank you to James Chalmers for the chalk and timber and thank you to David Pendegrass of Mears, our site agent, for making the site ready for this delivery at hardly any notice.  

 

Cat Fletcher and Duncan Baker-Brown met Kevin McCloud at Grand Design Live(GDL) last week. 

GDL 

Duncan & Cat made a waste-themed presentation at the show before catching up with Kevin. The Brighton Waste House is of course the 2013 development of the original 'House That Kevin Built' that was designed by Duncan and built at 'Grand Designs Live' over 6 days in 2008. Kevin pledged to visit site as soon as he had a free moment in his busy schedule. 

Rationel to supply windows and doors for the Waste House  

'Rationel are proud to be involved in the THTKB: Waste House as the supplier of timber and aluminium clad timber windows and doors to the project. Our strong focus on energy performance, together with our commitment to the environment and sustainable development, makes this the perfect partner project for Rationel. Having now manufactured high quality windows and doors for almost 60 years, Rationel have a wealth of experience in high performance window specification and supply, with projects ranging from single dwelling retrofits, to schools, hospitals, offices, flats and large scale housing developments, including a number of Passivhaus projects

For further information, please visit our website www.rationel.co.uk or call us on 01869 248181'

The Waste House site is busy again!

May 2013: 

Columns going up on site at the Waste House. 

For the last two weeks the Waste House site has been very busy for the first time in a while. Last week we took delivery of the ground floor columns that have been constructed over the last three months by students from City College Brighton & Hove. These columns are made from surplus ply and timber off-cuts collected last autumn. Our waste guru Cat Fletcher, together with a couple of student volunteers, took a day to fill the columns with waste packing case polystyrene providing insulation for the structure.

This week a 'hyab' lorry donated by Sussex Haulage arrived with its own crane to deliver first floor ply and timber beams to site and place them directly onto the columns.

The site was busy with students from City College and Mears' apprentices assembling the Waste House frame. We also welcomed visiting students from the Faculty of Arts and journalist Jess McCabe from Sustainable Housing Magazine.

Meanwhile we are busy looking for waste chalk from local building sites so that Rowland Keable from Ram Cast CIC can make our rammed chalk wall from the middle of May onwards. We are also looking forward to welcoming local school children to our site and hope that they come with their old (but clean) toothbrushes and video cassettes to help fill the walls of the Waste House.

A busy day on the Waste House site. 


November 2012:

Caroline Lucas, MP, opens the 'waste house phase of the build.

Caroline Lucas, Brighton's Green MP, cemented a brick at the commencement of work. She said: "When you describe this project to people they don't believe it can possibly withstand the wind, the rain and the elements but what they are going to demonstrate is that it certainly can...This [project] is good for creating jobs and good for the environment."

 

As our build of the 'Waste House' begins in earnest, we can thank the enormous support we've had in what is a genuinely community-wide project.

In particular we would like to say thank you to Mears who have believed in this project and been behind it from the start. Mears have very kindly offered to manage the entire build project; supervising and securing the site, providing health and safety and site induction for everyone working on the site, transportation and lots more. And, they’re providing all this for free!

As the project has progressed they have been joined by: City College Brighton and Hove, whose students will be creating the wooden frame and cassettes that make up the structure of the building; South Downs Solar who are giving us a state of the art photovoltaic roof to generate the electricity required and Westgate Joinery who are providing external doors and windows that are the very latest in triple-glazed, highly insulating technology.

We estimate that the generous donations of time, expertise, manpower and technology will be worth nearly £200,000 to the university and we would not be able to complete this project without their help.

In addition to the supporters above we are working with a number of organisations whose help is invaluable. These include Freegle, who will be helping us to source the materials needed for the build from developments around the city, and Work This Way, part of the Prisoners' Education Trust, that will help with aspects of the build and the transportation of materials to the site.

October 2012:

Duncan Baker-Brown talks to BBC Sussex listeners on 11th October about the exciting project and the new directions we're taking the eco-architecture build that began with Duncan's work with Kevin McCloud and the 2008 version of The House that Kevin Built

August 2012: 

 

We have decided to focus on how to reuse waste material

We have had an extremely busy month or so on the project. For example in addition to high tech windows and solar panels we are now going to make THTKB out of locally sourced waste material from building sites, recycling centres etc. This is a hugely ambitious leap forward for the project and will really test the idea that " there is no such thing as waste, just stuff in the wrong place!" We have decided to focus on how to reuse waste material on a real-life building for a number of reasons because, not least because we know how important it is to reuse and recycle from the point of view of the environment. We are also very lucky to have experts focussing on these issues within the University Dr Ryan Woodard (www.brighton.ac.uk/set/contact/details.php?uid=rw95), as well as the Faculty of Arts' own Nick Gant (arts.brighton.ac.uk/staff/nick-gant) who is co-director of the Inheritable Futures Laboratory (IF:Lab), sustainable design research group and co-wrote the MA in Sustainable Design at Brighton. In addition we are working with Jonathan Essex (www.bioregional.com/about-us/our-people/jonathan-essex/) who is Bioregional's Sustainable Construction Manager (responsible for BedZed and One Brighton) and most probably Wasteworks (www.wasteworks.co.uk) who have experience in sorting and making things from building site waste. Last but not least our team has been joined by local waste worrier Cat Fletcher (www.ilovefreegle.org/groups/south-east) who helped start up Freegle (www.ilovefreegle.org/)

It looks like we will be on site in the early Winter thanks the continued support of Mears (www.mearsgroup.co.uk) and Brighton & Hove City Council. As normal if you would like to be involved please contact Duncan on duncan@bbm-architects.co.uk

Artists impression of completed THTKB at the University of Brighton.

Image: Artist's impression of the completed building.

June 2012

While the site has been quiet for a the past few months, across the faculty we have been actively working on ideas for the new building and how we will work together with our neighboring communities and schools to create a place for sharing and exchanging our ideas, skills and resources. Now we are preparing to create a new prototype and a long-term living experiment that will, once constructed, continue to be a site for experimentation and for exchanging knowledge within the college and with those businesses and communities who wish to work and engage with us. The building will be an innovative place to visit as well as provide a studio for our postgraduate students. We hope it will be the hub from which we will develop new relationships with businesses and the public sector as well as with social and cultural groups that stimulate shared working and shared learning.

 

October 2011 

On Wednesday 5th October Brighton Pavilion MP Dr Caroline Lucas (The UK's only Green MP) came to inspect the THTKB site.

Caroline arrived with Green Councillor Amy Kennedy. It was a real boost to receive such positive and enthusiastic support from our local Green politicians. Caroline was particularly interested in THTKB's ambition to train students and apprentices around emerging green industries stating that "I absolutely agree with you that our best way of recession is through investment in green industries, and always make the case that not only would that be good for the environment, it could be one of the fastest job creation programmes in history if we did it properly!"

Caroline Lucas MP visits THTKB Image: From left to right Dr Caroline Lucas MP, Amy Kennedy, Duncan Baker-Brown, Anne Boddington

Read Caroline's blog about her visit on http://bit.ly/p12W5m.

We are still looking for about £125,000 to complete the rebuild. We are hoping to have these funds in place this Autumn/ Winter so that the rebuild can be complete for opening at next year's Graduate Show.

August 2011

Phase Two will commence in October 2011 when students and pupils are back from Summer holidays. However we need to raise a big lump of money to be donated over the Summer to ensure this happens. 

7 July 2011 

With the help of apprentices from The Mears Group architecture students and senior lecturers such as Anthony Roberts built this amazing building over a four-week period in May 2011.

This structure comprised a number of load-bearing walls made from waste material such as rammed chalk and straw bales, as well as a number of other walls made from waste timber stud work and ply sheet.

The pavilion was deigned by Interior Architecture tutor Glenn Longden-Thurgood and his colleague Kate Cheyne as well as local Consulting engineer Tom Bedford of BBP.

It takes its inspiration from the ethos informing The House That Kevin Built, i.e. to use waste materials and/ or locally sourced, organic, compostable material.

The waste material was sourced from the £100 million new Amex building currently under construction two streets east of the Faculty of Art’s building on Grand Parade.

In addition to the huge effort of all mentioned above I would just like to say a big 'thank you' to the following people that helped make this inspirational project a reality:

Ian Shuttleworth, Paul Kellaway, Gary Lester and all the apprentices at The Mears Group; Mark Jones from Sir Robert McAlpine Ltd; Rowland Keable of In Situ Rammed Earth Co Ltd; Blanche Cameron of RESET and CAT; John Ritzon, Catherine Harper and Anne Boddington from The University of Brighton.

 

24 June 2011

 

Phase One of THTKB was completed.

The Mears Group have just completed Phase One of the building work for our project. Well done to everybody involved. These works included digging out a huge 2m deep hole, putting the spoil to one side and putting it back in carefully compacted layers. This approach ensured no waste left site as it was compacted and reused. Spare chalk from the Graduate Pavilion build was used to make up the ground level as well. The Mears Group then cast minimal foundation

s using a specialist low carbon concrete mix specified by Tom Bedford of BEP. All service connections were made as well as below ground drainage and a rain water soakaway. I would like to thank everybody who has been involved with this project, with a special mention for -

  • Ian Shuttleworth, Paul Kellaway, Gary Lester and all the apprentices at The Mears Group 
  • Tom Bedford of BBP, Mark Robinson of Robinson Associates, James Rae & Stuart Paine of BBM, Martin Randall, Sue Dubberly and Tom Quady of Brighton & Hove City Council 
  • and John Ritzon, Andrew Scanlan, Michael Wilson, Prof. Susannah Hagan, Catherine Harper, Anne Boddington all of The University of Brighton.

23rd May 2011

The Mears Group began work on site, making the site secure and marking out the foundations. Apprentices were on hand with the work moving dirt and rubble in preparation for the foundations markings. See images of the Mears Group beginning work on the House that Kevin Built site.

June 2011

 

Architecture students inspired to their own build

Inspired by the innovative practice that Duncan Baker-Brown uses on the House that Kevin Built, students in their final year undertook the 'Green Pavilion' project. It became a centrepiece for the 2011 Burt Brill and Cardens Graduate Show. Read more about the 'Green Pavilion'.

April 2011

 

Grand Designs Live: 

Watch interviews with architect Duncan Baker-Brown filmed at Grand Designs Live in April 2011. View THTKB videos.

In the press:

South East Today interview with Kevin McCloud | BBC Sussex Radio: Danny Pike's interview of Kevin on 26th April (interview is in last 20 minutes of programme) | Brighton Argus report 'Going Green' 16th April

Grand Designs Live happened 30th April at the ExCel conference centre, London. Kevin McCloud gave a whole session to the discussion of Duncan Baker-Brown's rebuild. Grand Theatre, ExCel, Saturday 30 April 14.30 – 15.15. See the Grand Designs Live website for further information http://www.granddesignslive.com/grand-theatre/ See the Winkball site video highlights of the day www.winkball.com/walls/CkjzGSy0AMrD/grand-designs-live-at-the-excel-centre also see interviews with Duncan on our THTKB video page.

Kevin McCloud talks about the rebuild of The House that Kevin Built and further architectural issues on the BBC's news programme. View Kevin McCloud on 18 April 2011 BBC show 

Opening the site 26th April 2011:

Architect Duncan Baker-Brown and the Mears Group open the site at Grand Parade ready for the ground works to begin. See images of the opening of the THTKB site 

 

A word from the architect:

"No time for blogging, too busy doing (at last) - which is very good news! We have started works on site with The Mears Group and achieved lots of publicity (The Argus/ BBC South East Today and BBC Sussex Surrey Radio) which the project needs to attract more support.

"Anyway the build cost issue..... Well the house won't be expensive in itself. It is coming out at about £2,200/m2 which totals up at about £190,000&+ vat, which is a pretty average build price despite all the ECO features. Our problem (as Kevin mentioned on local radio two days ago) is that because THTKB is now designated a University 'research facility' it attracts VAT at 20%. In other words we have to add another £40,000 or so onto the capital cost of this project that 'normal' houses would not attract. In addition to this we are allowing for landscape and boundary costs, and finally, design fees that are again a bit more expensive than normal as we have to employ a CDM Coordinator to deal with Health & Safety issues on site."

March 2011

 

First words from architect Duncan Baker-Brown. 

This is my first blog relating to the rebuilding of The House that Kevin Built ( or THTKB as we call it for now) on the Faculty of Arts' Grand Parade campus in Brighton.

The fund raising website has just been updated and it looks great. So thanks for that Michael.

You will see that we are rebuilding THTKB in partnership with Brighton & Hove City Council and The Building Research Establishment. Take a look at their links for more information about what they are up to.

We have had a huge pledge of support from The Mears Group. They will be installing everything we need below the ground. So drainage runs and low carbon foundations, as well as providing their Site Agent Brian Wylie for the duration of the whole build! Apprentices from The Mears Group will join students from the faculty to help the build. So we think we have the equivalent of £65-£75,000 worth of support from them. Thank you very much.

The Mears Group hope to start on site in about three weeks time. We just need to remove a pile of tiles from the site first.

We have also had pledges of support from the original THTKB Builders Deeks & Steere. Justin the original site agent will be employed as a specialist low carbon building consultant for the build.

We are currently looking a building sites around Brighton to supply us with 'waste' or 'resource' as we like to call it for the build.

Over the last two weeks I have seen inspiring work from first year Architecture students who made beautiful modular panels out of waste and Interior Architects who re-deigned THTKB and the whole Grand Parade site for that matter ; all inspired by the ethos of THTKB , ie. to use second-hand and/ or replenishable materials. The work can be seen on this website. I am also starting to work with Richard Bartlett a student from Prof. Andrew Millers Sustainability of the Built Environment MSc course in the Faculty of Science & Engineering. Richard will utilise IES software to thermal model THTKB and critically appraise our Modcell panels by comparing them with precast concrete panels (environmentally friendly vs. unfriendly).

I want to welcome Jack & James two recent graduates from the Faculty of Arts. They are charged with 'capturing' the rebuild project. and are currently busy setting up camera's from high rooftop vantage points. Their first images will be on our site very soon. If anyone knows of a tv production company that would like to make the tv documentary of the rebuild please contact me.


There is so much happening right now.... It's brilliant.


THTKB London 2008

THTKB London 2008

Kevin McCloud filmed from The House that Kevin BuiltImage: Kevin McCloud films from the upper floor of The House that Kevin Built


‘The House that Kevin Built’ was an innovative project to design and construct live on television a highly sustainable domestic property over a period of 6 days using a combination of ‘offsite’ innovative and interesting building systems and materials.

The project, carried out in collaboration with Talkback Thames TV and Grand Designspresenter Kevin McCloud, was executed outside the Excel centre in London’s docklands in conjunction with The Grand Designs Live show from 4 May 2008.

The idea:

  • To combine two brand new innovative green prefab systems
  • MODCELL - Heavyweight, highly insulated, locally sourced, affordable replenishable/ waste  materials -combining a minimal amount of expensive engineered timber plus cheaper straw/ lime/ hem; Creating cellular, self-cooling/ warming ground floor bedrooms & bathroom
  • FACIT - Lightweight, highly insulated, replenishable/ waste materials, all cut out with a computer controlled router
  • Creating double height open plan living room/ kitchen/ dining room ‘balloon’
  • Both designed by UK Architects pushing the boundaries

The ambition:

  • To prove that fluffy, crumbly, organic low carbon materials can compete with their more established high energy high carbon counterparts
  • To focus on prefabrication because it reduces wastage on site to a minimum (up pf 20% of building material ends up in landfill using traditional ‘wet’ trades
  • To use high tech construction methods to reduce time on site, material waste and accuracy on site
  • To prove that an understanding of lightweight material to insulate and heavyweight materials to store energy will mean that you don’t have to rely too much on expensive high tech gear to create a low carbon house.

Modcell crane on site of the House that Kevin built

Facit at work on the inside of the eco architecture project House that Kevin built 

Straw walling at the eco-building project House that Kevin built 

Rammed earth walling for the House that Kevin built 

Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic roof on The House that Kevin Built 

 Topping out on the House that Kevin built eco-building project

 Complete eco building ready for the 4000 public visitors in 2 days

The House that Kevin Built. Eco-facts

  • G.I.A : 85m2
  • Type of Project: Prefab New build
  • Final Account: £170,000+vat
  • Estimated Cost/m2 inc. renewables £2,000/m2
  • Contact Period: 5 days
  • Energy Rating: A+
  • Code For Sustainable Homes Rating: Level 5
  • Renewables: Solar Thermal Glass Tiles, 1.5kW Photovoltaic Tiles

Highlights of the construction were shown nightly on Channel 4’s programme ‘Grand Designs Live’ which was broadcast live from a stage ‘setup’ adjacent to the building site.

House that Kevin built 

House that Kevin built 

House that Kevin built

House that Kevin built 

 

‘The House that Kevin Built’ was dismantled at the end of the show and has been re-erected at the Building Research Establishment’s Innovations Park.


Footage of the 2008, Grand Designs, The House That Kevin Built


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