Dr Andy Knott

Andy Knott

arts research University of Brighton

Scholarly biography and interests

Andy Knott is a lecturer in Politics and Philosophy in the School of Humanities, where he began working in 2004. He works in an interdisciplinary manner, largely combining political theory, history, and (continental) philosophy.

Knott completed his undergraduate degree in History at Portsmouth, and sat the MA in Cultural & Critical Theory at Brighton. He is in the final stages of his PhD, whose title is The Multitude and Hegemony. This explores historical uses of the term the multitude, alongside a contemporary consideration of a politics of the multitude, as proposed by Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri. Historical applications of the multitude are considered through the work of Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli, Hobbes, and Spinoza. The contemporary political viability of the multitude considers Gramsci, Laclau, and Hardt and Negri. The project also considers historical shifts in the forms of labour and their impact on politics, largely through the concept of immaterial labour. It also theorises the possibilities for radical democratic politics in the communicative epoch of the twenty-first century.

Andy Knott is interested in the following fields: post-Marxism and discourse theory; neo-Marxism; democratic theory; globalisation; Italian autonomism and operaismo; forms of labour and their implications for politics; economic forms of ‘identity’, including notions of the multitude, class, and the individual.

He is particularly interested in the following theorists: Marsilius of Padua, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Spinoza, Marx, Gramsci, Laclau, Mouffe, and Hardt and Negri. 

Knott is currently presenting his work through seminar papers at a number of conferences and lecture series.

Research activity 

 

Lectures and conference papers

  • ‘Immaterial Labour’ at the University of Brighton Social Movements Group, 18 September 2009
  • ‘Immaterial Labour’ at the University of Brighton Graduate Research Seminar Series, 20 October 2009
  • ‘Negri and agency’ at the University of Brighton Philosophy Society, 18 March 2010
  • ‘The common and hegemony’ at the Spring Conference in Social Sciences and Humanities, Hastings, 23 April 2010
  • ‘Politics in the twenty-first century: a proposal’, at the University of Brighton Social Movements Group, 2 June 2010
  • ‘The common and hegemony’ at the Tenth Annual Conference in Political Theory at the University of Essex, 16 June 2010
  • ‘The common and hegemony’ at ‘Politics in the twenty-first century: a proposal’ at Crisis, Rupture, Anxiety: An Interdisciplinary Postgraduate Conference, University of Salford, 9 September 2010
  • ‘Hobbes, fear, and the multitude’ at Politics of Fear, Fear of Politics CAPPE Conference, University of Brighton, 15 September 2010