Dr Annebella Pollen

Annebella Pollen

arts research University of Brighton

Scholarly biography and interests

Dr Annebella Pollen is Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design, Director of Historical and Critical Studies for the College of Arts and Humanities, and AHRC Research Fellow (2015-17): http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/woodcraftfolk 

Annebella (PhD, University of the Arts London) holds a first class BA in Visual Culture, a PGCert in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education (Distinction) and an MA in Design History and Material Culture (Distinction), all from the University of Brighton where she has lectured since 2005 in the History of Art and Design.

Dr Annebella Pollen is Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design and Director of Historical and Critical Studies for the Faculty of Arts. Her research interests and publications span a range of forms and historical periods but are united by their focus on the visual and material culture of everyday life, and the use of the past in popular culture.

A new cultural history of the British woodcraft movement

For 2015-17 Annebella has been awarded a prestigious two-year AHRC Fellowship as Principal Investigator on the project 'Picturesqueness in Everything: The Visual and Material Culture of British Woodcraft Groups, 1916-2016'. This grew out of Annebella's 2013/14 University of Brighton sabbatical award, and develops her ongoing research into the role of art, craft, design and dress as forms of resistance, radical educational strategies and utopian ideals, focusing on progressive interwar reform organisations including the Kindred of the Kibbo Kift, the Woodcraft Folk and the Order of Woodcraft Chivalry. At the same time, Annebella is co-steering the 2015/16 Heritage Lottery Funded project, 90 Years of the Woodcraft Folk. The resulting research will be developed through a series of conference papers, publications, exhibitions, public events, community projects and a new oral history archive. It is supported by project partners including Museum of London, London School of Economics Archive, the British Library's Sound Archive and Whitechapel Art Gallery. Work-in-progress has been shared at conferences including Alternative Modernisms (Cardiff University),Utopias (University of Helsinki) and Design for War and Peace (University of Oxford).http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/projects/woodcraftfolk

Dress Histories

Research into dress and design histories cuts across many of Annebella's interests. Forthcoming research and publications include the co-edited collection with Charlotte Nicklas, Dress History: New Directions in Method and Practice (Bloomsbury, 2015), and research into historical dress reform. Aspects of this latter work related to Fabian and feminist footwear has been shared at 2013 conferences including Radical Gestures: Designing Protest, Resistance and Refusal (UAL) and The World at Your Feet(Northampton University and Museum) and is forthcoming as a book chapter in 2015. Previous research and publications include work on the silhouette as a source for dress history (see below) and 21st century mass-produced dressing-up costumes for girls (Textile History, 2011).

Mass Photography and Everyday Life

Annebella’s longstanding research interest is in the history and ethnography of mass photography. Her output in this area has encompassed publications, research papers, posters and exhibition content on the subject of found photos, family albums, vernacular archives, amateur competitions and the photographic industry. This is the focus of her first book, Mass Photography: Collective Histories of Everyday Life (I. B. Tauris, forthcoming).

Annebella's research in this area began with her MA study of the culture of amateur photography in the interwar period and led into an AHRC-funded doctorate at University of the Arts, London ('Identity, Memory, Compassion and Competition: Mass Participation Photography and Everyday Life', 2006-10), which examined the 55,000 photographs of everyday life generated by the One Day for Life project, 1987, now held in the Mass Observation Archive. Since then, the research has expanded to include examination of popular photography more broadly, from the history of high street photo-processing to the interpretation of popular tropes in practice. This work has been disseminated through local, national and international conference presentations, public talks, research seminars, posters and a wide range of journal articles, book chapters and web essays. Together with Juliet Baillie, she is the editor of Reconsidering Amateur Photography for EitherAnd, an online publication for the National Media Museum.Through these projects, Annebella has evolved innovative research methodologies for the interpretation of 'majority' photography and argues for the complex personal significance and social value of a photographic practice frequently dismissed as lacking in intention, ambition and consequence.

Popular Image Culture

Annebella's research interest in popular practices in photography intersects with her work on popular image culture more broadly. This includes research and publications on Victorian valentines (for Early Popular Visual Culture, 2014), Edwardian picture postcards (for Photography and Culture, 2009) and the history of the silhouette portrait. In 2013, Annebella jointly led a University of Brighton Springboard Grant-funded research project, with Professor Lou Taylor, Dr Charlotte Nicklas and Nick Tyson, Curator of the Regency Town House, Hove, on this topic. This resulted in a study day, edited publication and exhibition, Profiles of the Past: Silhouettes, Fashion and Image 1760-1960, which form a part of the larger Profiles of the Past Heritage Lottery Fund project http://www.profilesofthepast.org.uk/

Mass Observation

Methodological Innovations: Using Mass Observation (2009-10) was a research network funded by a University of Brighton Research Innovations grant and co-ordinated by colleagues Mark Bhatti and Louise Purbrick, with the support of Professor Dorothy Sheridan MBE of the Mass Observation Archive. It established a cluster of researchers in arts, humanities and social sciences interested in using and interpreting the unique accounts of everyday life held in the Mass Observation Archive, with the aim of understanding, debating and sharing methods between researchers from a variety of fields, and thereby extending interdisciplinary practice.

As Research Fellow for Methodological Innovations, Annebella helped establish and maintain a lively discussion network of 150 international members; co-organised and contributed to two method and methodology workshops; co-organised and spoke at a sell-out national conference and designed an accompanying exhibition as part of Brighton Festival Fringe, 2010. Annebella's research, building on this project, received an award in the University of Brighton Research Poster competition in 2011, has formed the basis of several conference papers and public talks and is the subject of two academic journal articles (History Workshop Journal, 2013 and Sociological Research Online, 2014).

Design History, Theory and Pedagogy

Annebella is an Executive Committe Member and Trustee of the Design History Society. This involves a number of responsibilities including peer-reviewing funding applications and paper proposals and chairing conference panels (National Institute of Design, Ahmedabad, India 2013 and University of Oxford 2014). She has particular responsibility for the annual international Design History Society Essay Prize. Annebella co-founded the University of Brighton Postgraduate Design History Society in 2005, and has gone on to research the role of history and theory teaching in the design curriculum. This research has been presented as papers for conferences in Glasgow School of Art and the Design Research Society in Oslo, and appeared in print in 2015 ('My position in the Design World: Locating Subjectivity in the Design Curriculum', Design and Culture).

Love Tokens and Affective Objects

The aim of The Rules of Attraction project (Royal Pavilion, Libraries and Museums, Brighton and Hove, 2007-8) was to uncover hidden histories of love and romance in local museum collections in order to produce innovative, creative and accessible exhibition content to attract new audiences. As one of six Researcher / Interpreter appointments, and as part of a team that included a musician, scientist and comedian, Annebella's research into flirtatious picture postcard inscriptions, wartime love tokens and insulting valentines has taken various forms. Outcomes have included Love Objects, a 50,000 word report, numerous conference papers, journal articles inPhotography & Culture and Early Popular Visual Culture, as well as public talks, website content and artefact research for the On the Pull exhibition, Brighton Museum, February-September 2008. Interviews related to this research have appeared in publications as diverse as Picture Postcard MonthlyCollector's Weekly (USA) and the Daily Mail

Teaching 

Annebella Pollen has taught since 2005 at the University of Brighton, both in the College of Arts and Humanities and also as Research Fellow in the School of Applied Social Science (2009-10).

In her current role as Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design, Annebella teaches across all levels of all degrees in the programme (BA hons. History of Art and Design; Visual Culture; History of Design; History of Decorative Arts and Crafts; Fashion and Dress History; Museum and Heritage Studies; MA History of Design and Material Culture).

As Director of Historical and Critical Studies for the College of Arts and Humanities, Annebella is responsible for overseeing history and theory teaching for 1000 students. Annebella's research into the relationship between studio and theory in design education received a Distinction in the PGCert in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, has been circulated through international conference presentation and in print (in Design & Culture 7:1, 2015).

Annebella is a registered PhD supervisor, currently co-supervising two AHRC-funded students. She welcomes applications from prospective candidates with interests in popular image culture, histories of photography, the material culture of everyday life and practices of resistance in art, design and dress.

Annebella's teaching portfolio includes visiting lecturer posts on undergraduate and postgraduate programmes at the Universities of Kingston, Sussex, Plymouth and Southampton, as well as at the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court and the University of the Arts, London. In 2013, Annebella was nominated for a University of Brighton Teaching Excellence Award. She is External Examiner for Design History in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Science, Northumbria University, 2014-15. 

Teaching 

Annebella Pollen has taught since 2005 at the University of Brighton, both in the College of Arts and Humanities and also as Research Fellow in the School of Applied Social Science (2009-10).

In her current role as Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design, Annebella teaches across all levels of all degrees in the programme (BA hons. History of Art and Design; Visual Culture; History of Design; History of Decorative Arts and Crafts; Fashion and Dress History; Museum and Heritage Studies; MA History of Design and Material Culture).

As Director of Historical and Critical Studies for the College of Arts and Humanities, Annebella is responsible for overseeing history and theory teaching for 1000 students. Annebella's research into the relationship between studio and theory in design education received a Distinction in the PGCert in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, has been circulated through international conference presentation and in print (in Design & Culture 7:1, 2015).

Annebella is a registered PhD supervisor, currently co-supervising two AHRC-funded students. She welcomes applications from prospective candidates with interests in popular image culture, histories of photography, the material culture of everyday life and practices of resistance in art, design and dress.

Annebella's teaching portfolio includes visiting lecturer posts on undergraduate and postgraduate programmes at the Universities of Kingston, Sussex, Plymouth and Southampton, as well as at the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court and the University of the Arts, London. In 2013, Annebella was nominated for a University of Brighton Teaching Excellence Award. She is External Examiner for Design History in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Science, Northumbria University, 2014-15. 

How I like to teach 

In my University of Brighton teaching, I wear two hats. As Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design, I teach students in the History of Art and Design programme. As Director of Historical and Critical Studies for the Faculty of Arts, I also oversee the historical and theoretical elements of arts practice courses. These differing roles require differing teaching styles and modes of delivery, even as they share subject content. As such, they require flexible, adaptive and innovative teaching to maximise student engagement.

Case Study 1 - Object-led Learning: Learning to Look, Learning to Feel

I firmly believe in the centrality of object-led teaching, wherever possible. At Brighton we are lucky enough to have extensive handling opportunities available in the Dress and Design History Teaching Collection. Compiled over many years through the enthusiasm of Professor Lou Taylor, this collection of historic dress, textiles and accessories, alongside printed material, photographs and other artefacts, provides a rare opportunity for students to handle period objects, and to encounter, first-hand, the size and weight, scent and feel, design and construction of the material culture of the past.

By engaging all of the senses, and examining objects made and used instead of objects as symbols and ideas, students can get close to their subject of study, debunk misconceptions and test theory. Through the knowledge brought by touch, students can increase their understanding of the materiality of things: the distinctive differences between natural and synthetic fibres, the changing size of waistlines over time, the differing weights of historical photographic formats, for example, can be revelatory and may only be understood through close examination of objects in the flesh. These kinds of opportunities can help demonstrate how objects were experienced, creating greater historical understanding. The surprise and interest expressed by students that I have taught in this way has led me to reflect further on the role of touch in learning, and I have gone on to develop taught content on the topic of sensual culture and the politics of touch for final year History of Art and Design students.

Case Study 2 - Theory and Practice: Objective and Subjective?

The role of history and theory in the teaching of art and design practice at degree level can sometimes be contested. While the importance of knowing your field for locating your own work is undisputed, and the acquisition of the skills and vocabulary to analyse and critique your own discipline is invaluable, the academic rigour of study and assessment in the historical and critical studies elements of courses can sometimes be negatively perceived as distinctly separate from, or even unnecessary to, the practice of making. As part of action research into student practitioners’ perceptions of this aspect of their art and design programmes, undertaken as part of the PGCert in Learning and Teaching in Higher Education, I examined what students value about Historical and Critical Studies. This research, presented at the 2013 Design Research Society conference in Oslo, published in Design and Culture journal, and the subject of the keynote lecture in Glasgow School of Art's 2015 CHEAD-funded seminar on The Role of Critical and Cultural Studies in Art School Education, has led me to reflect on the division that is sometimes constructed between theory and practice. Where, traditionally, theory might be understood as ‘objective’ and design practice as ‘subjective’, this research emphasised that a personal, subjective engagement with the object of study is as vital to the study of history and theory as it is to creative practice. Despite enduring myths to the contrary, the ‘I’ is essential to reflective learning and teaching in history and theory.

Originally inspired by student observations, this research later returned to the classroom to invigorate teaching practice. Through experimenting with new seminar content and encouraging embodied writing practices, this research has been utilised to bring separate elements of course provision into closer and more productive proximity.

Case Study 3 - Current and local: History of Art and Design on the streets

The core challenge of teaching history is how to make a necessarily distant subject of study relevant. New ways of thinking about the past are nowhere more visible in the everyday life of Brighton than in the latest trend for all things old. Brighton’s identity as a site for retro and revival fashion and design provided the inspiration for the module I designed entitled The Past in the Present. Available as an option for all second-year undergraduate students on the History of Art and Design programme, this teaching capitalises on the resources on our doorsteps to provide an accessible means of engagement with contemporary ways of understanding history. Through matching historical understanding to current practices, students can exercise their knowledge of popular culture to explore the everyday ways that the past is reinterpreted – whether as sacred memorial or cheap commodity, whether cherished as heritage or dismissed as obsolete. Through this kind of teaching, which engages with the rich material culture of the immediate locale, students bring what they already know to the classroom as a resource. Through theorising their experiences, they can learn to act as cultural critics and historians of their own time.

Research-Teaching-Research

As an active researcher, much of my teaching is underpinned by my own first-hand studies, whether through the regular refreshment of lecture content, the design of specialist module provision or, in the case of research projects, through directly sharing research resources with students in archives and collections. This is particularly the case at Masters and PhD level, where student researchers frequently acquire both their subject knowledge and their methodological toolkits through the example of their tutors’ case studies. In these contexts, I teach research through teaching my own research. In turn, in the crucible of the classroom, information does not flow one way; my thinking is stimulated and challenged by the input and inspiration of my students. 


Research activity

Repository holdings 

Number of items: 31.

Pollen, Annebella (2015) Mass Photography: Collective Histories of Everyday Life International Library of Visual Culture . I.B. Tauris, UK. ISBN 9781784530112

Nicklas, Charlotte and Pollen, Annebella (2015) Dress history: new directions in theory and practice [Edited Collections]

Nicklas, Charlotte and Pollen, Annebella (2015) Dress History Now: Terms, Themes and Tools In: Nicklas, Charlotte and Pollen, Annebella, eds. Dress History: New Directions in Theory and Practice. Bloomsbury, UK. ISBN 9780857855411

Pollen, Annebella (2015) Radical Shoemaking and Dress Reform from Fabians to Feminists In: Nicklas, Charlotte and Pollen, Annebella, eds. Dress History: New Directions in Theory and Practice. Bloomsbury, UK. ISBN 9780857855411

Pollen, Annebella (2015) My Position in the Design World: Locating subjectivity in the design curriculum Design and Culture, 7 (1). pp. 85-105. ISSN 1754-7075

Pollen, Annebella (2014) Shared Ownership and Mutual Imaginaries: Researching Research in Mass Observation Sociological Research Online, 19 (3). ISSN 1360-7804

Pollen, Annebella (2014) Book Review: Oral History and Photography by Alexander Freund and Alistair Thomson (eds) Photography and Culture, 7 (3). pp. 337-340. ISSN 1751-4517

Pollen, Annebella and Baillie, Juliet (2014) Amateur Photographic Communities, Real and Imagined: Collective Identity in Camera Clubs and Mass-Participation Events Photoworks Annual, 21. pp. 160-167.

Pollen, Annebella (2014) Mad men, mad world: sex, politics, style and the 1960s Visual Studies, 30 (1). pp. 114-115. ISSN 1472-586X

Pollen, Annebella (2014) Fungible Photographs: Book review of Digital Snaps by Jonas Larsen and Mette Sandbye (eds) Source: The Photographic Review, 79.

Pollen, Annebella (2014) Research methodology in mass observation past and present: “scientifically, about as valuable as a chimpanzee’s tea party at the zoo? In: Hughes, J. and Goodwin, J., eds. Documentary and Archival Research. Sage Benchmarks in Social Research, 3 . Sage, UK. ISBN 9781446210949

Pollen, Annebella (2014) The Valentine has Fallen Upon Evil Days: Mocking Victorian valentines and the ambivalent laughter of the carnivalesque Early Popular Visual Culture, 12 (2). pp. 127-173. ISSN 1746-0654

Pollen, Annebella (2013) Researching the One Day for Life project: an interview with Annebella Pollen In: Tinkler, Penny, ed. Using Photographs in Social and Historical Research. Sage, London, pp. 110-114. ISBN 9780857020369

Pollen, Annebella (2013) Moving targets: photography and its metaphors Modernism/modernity, 20 (1). pp. 123-127. ISSN 1071-6068

Pollen, Annebella (2013) “Historians in Two Hundred Years' Time Are Going to Die for That!”: Historiography and Temporality in the “One Day for Life” Photography Archive History & Memory, 25 (2). pp. 66-101. ISSN 0935-560X

Pollen, Annebella (2013) The Mass Observers: A History 1937-1949 by James Hinton Cercles: Revue Pluridisciplinaire du Monde Anglophone. ISSN 1292-8968

Pollen, Annebella (2013) Ordinary and Everywhere New Formations, 79. pp. 159-161. ISSN 0950-2378

Pollen, Annebella (2013) Research Methodology in Mass Observation Past and Present: ‘Scientifically, about as valuable as a chimpanzee’s tea party at the zoo’? History Workshop Journal, 75 (1). pp. 213-235. ISSN 1363-3554

Taylor, Lou, Pollen, Annebella and Nicklas, Charlotte (2013) Silhouettes, Fashion and Image 1760-1960 [Edited Collections]

Pollen, Annebella (2013) Touch Screen: Feeling and Seeing in Photography and Textiles In: Little, M., ed. Beyond Surface and Material: Considering the Relationship between Textiles and Photography. Rugby Art Gallery and Museum, UK, pp. 41-43. ISBN 9780955082979

Pollen, Annebella (2012) Making, Selling and Wearing Boys' Clothes in Late Victorian England by Clare Rose Enterprise & Society, 13 (2). pp. 432-435. ISSN 1467-2227

Pollen, Annebella and Baillie, Juliet (2012) Reconsidering Amateur Photography [Edited Collections]

Pollen, Annebella and Baillie, Juliet (2012) Reconsidering amateur photography: an introduction National Media Museum, London, UK.

Pollen, Annebella (2012) When is a cliche not a cliche? Reconsidering mass-produced sunsets National Media Museum, London, UK.

Pollen, Annebella (2012) The Book the Nation is Waiting for! One Day for Life In: di Bello, Patrizia, Wilson, Colette and Zamir, Shamoon, eds. The Photobook from Talbot to Ruscha and Beyond. IBTauris, London. ISBN 9781848856165

Pollen, Annebella (2011) Performing spectacular girlhood: mass-produced dressing-up costumes and the commodification of imagination Textile History, 42 (2). pp. 162-180. ISSN 0040-4969

Pollen, Annebella (2011) Doing Family Photography by Gillian Rose New Formations, 71. pp. 140-141. ISSN 0950-2378

Pollen, Annebella (2011) Plus Ca Change...: Book Review of Risto Sarvas and David M. Frohlich, From Snapshots to Social Media: The Changing Picture of Domestic Photography New Formations, 74. pp. 134-137. ISSN 0950-2378

Pollen, Annebella (2009) Sweet nothings: suggestive Brighton postcard inscriptions Photography and Culture, 2 (1). pp. 77-88. ISSN 1751-4517

Pollen, Annebella (2007) Civilising sucking: the production of ceramic infant feeding devices in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries In: Crone, R., ed. New Perspectives in British Cultural History. Cambridge Scholars Press, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, pp. 104-117. ISBN 9781847181558

Pollen, Annebella (2007) Polyfoto of unknown woman Knowing the Unknown Sitter, UK.

This list was generated on Sat Aug 1 13:51:28 2015 BST.

Other research activities

Books

  • Kibbo Kift Kindred (Donlon Books, forthcoming 2015)

Curatorial work

Journal articles, book sections and essays

  • 'More Modern than the Moderns: Performing Cultural Evolution in the Kibbo Kift Kindred', book chapter in Robert Bud (ed), Being Modern: Science and Culture in the Early 20th Century (UCL press, expected 2016)
  • 'Amateur Practices' book chapter in Gil Pasternak (ed), The Handbook of Photographic Studies (Bloomsbury, expected 2016)
  • 'Selling Popular Photography on the British High Street', book chapter in Stephen Bull (ed.), A Companion to Photography (Wiley-Blackwell, forthcoming 2016)
  • 'Utopian futures and imagined pasts in the ambivalent modernism of the Kibbo Kift Kindred', book chapter in David Ayers and Benedikt Hjartarson (eds), European Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies Vol.4 Utopia: The Avant-Garde, Modernism and (Im)possible Life (De Gruyter, forthcoming 2015)
  • 'My Position in the Design World: Locating subjectivity in the design curriculum', peer-reviewed article, Design and Culture special issue: 'It's Personal: Subjectivity in Design History', 7:1, March 2015, pp. 85-106.
  • 'Mackintoshes and Trilbies: Photographing like Humphrey Spender in Mass Education', commissioned essay for Brighton Photo Biennial, Photoworks October 2014 http://photoworks.org.uk/mackintoshes-trilbies-photographing-like-humphrey-spender-mass-education/
  • 'Shared Ownership and Mutual Imaginaries: Researching research in Mass Observation', peer-reviewed article, Sociological Research Online special issue: 'Mass Observation as Method', 19:3, 9, August 2014 http://www.socresonline.org.uk/19/3/9.html
  • 'The Valentine has Fallen Upon Evil Days: Mocking Victorian valentines and the ambivalent laughter of the carnivalesque', peer-reviewed article, Early Popular Visual Culture special issue: 'Disciplinarity and Social Control in Early Media', 12.2 May 2014, pp. 127-173http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/bYKHiTRwItR9g8tHHbyw/full
  • 'Research Methodology in Mass Observation Past and Present: 'Scientifically, about as valuable as a chimpanzee's tea party at the zoo'?', book chapter in Jason Hughes and John Goodwin (eds.), Documentary and Archival Research: Sage Benchmarks in Social Research Methods (Sage, 2014)
  • Love Letters and Hate Mail: Victorian Vinegar Valentines', web content, Royal Pavilion, Museums and Libraries, Brighton and Hovehttp://brightonmuseums.org.uk/discover/category/authors/annebella-pollen/
  • 'The Family of Man Redux', commissioned essay for series Who's Looking at the Family, Now? Photoworks, November 2013 http://photoworks.org.uk/claudia-sola/
  • Historians in two hundred years' time are going to die for that! Historiography and Temporality in the One Day for Life Photography Archive', peer-reviewed article, History and Memory (25:2, Fall / Winter 2013), pp. 66-101
  • 'Touch Screen: Feeling and Seeing in Photography and Textiles', commissioned catalogue essay in Marlene Little, Beyond Surface and Material: Considering the Relationship between Textiles and Photography (Rugby Museum and Art Gallery, 2013), pp. 41-43
  • 'Introduction: Peering into the Shadows, Researching Silhouettes' and 'Conclusion: Silhouettes in the 21st Century' in Lou Taylor, Annebella Pollen and Charlotte Nicklas (eds.), Silhouettes, Fashion and Image 1760-1960 (University of Brighton, 2013)
  • 'Moving Targets: Photography and its Metaphors', review essay, Modernism and Modernity, 20:1, 2013, pp.123-128 http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/modernism-modernity/v020/20.1.pollen.pdf
  • 'Reconsidering Amateur Photography: A Round Table Discussion' (with Juliet Baillie, Stephen Bull, Peter Buse, Karen Cross, Graham Rawle, Sarah Kember and Roger Tooth)  Either/And, National Media Museum-funded website, 2013 http://eitherand.org/reconsidering-amateur-photography/reconsidering-amateur-photography-symposium/  
  • 'Research Methodology in Mass Observation Past and Present: 'Scientifically, about as valuable as a chimpanzee's tea party at the zoo'?', peer-reviewed article, History Workshop Journal 75 (2013), pp. 213-235
  • 'Researching the One Day for Life Project: An interview with Annebella Pollen' in Penny Tinkler, Using Photographs in Historical and Social Research (Sage, 2013), pp. 110-114
  • 'The Book the Nation is Waiting for! One Day for Life', book chapter in Patrizia de Bello, Colette Wilson and Shamoon Zamir (eds.), The Photobook from Talbot to Ruscha and Beyond (I. B. Tauris, 2012), pp. 145-163
  • 'Reconsidering Amateur Photography', conversation with Juliet Baillie, Either/And,National Media Museum-funded website, 2012 http://eitherand.org/reconsidering-amateur-photography/reconsidering-amateur-photography-annebella-pollen/
  • 'When is a photographic cliche not a cliche? Reconsidering mass-produced sunsets', web essay, Either/And, National Media Museum-funded website, 2012http://eitherand.org/reconsidering-amateur-photography/when-cliche-not-cliche-reconsidering-mass-produced/
  • 'Performing Spectacular Girlhood: Mass-produced dressing up costumes and the commodification of imagination', peer-reviewed article, Textile History 43, 2011, pp. 162-180
  • 'Beyond Us and Them: Participatory photography after Mass Observation', commissioned catalogue essay in Les Monaghan, photobreightmet, Bolton Museum and Art Gallery, 2011
  • 'Sweet Nothings: Suggestive Brighton Postcard Inscriptions', peer-reviewed article, Photography and Culture 2:1, 2009, pp. 77-88
  • 'Civilising Sucking: The production of ceramic infant feeding devices in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries', book chapter in Rosalind Crone, David Gange and Katy Jones (eds.), New Perspectives in British Cultural History(Cambridge Scholars Press, 2007), pp. 104-118
  • 'Polyfoto of an Unknown Woman,' Knowing the Unknown Sitter, commissioned web essay, British Academy-funded website 'Unknown Sitter', 2007http://nickybird.com/cms/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/annebellapollen.pdf

Reviews, responses and shorter writings

  • Book review of Lauren M. E. Goodlad, Lilya Kaganovsky, Robert A. Rushing (eds),Mad Men, Mad World: Sex, Politics, Style, and the 1960s for Visual Studies, 30:1, 2015 pp. 114-5 http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/TrmAAcbxVIUCwsTpFNV6/full
  • Book review of Alexander Freund and Alistair Thomson (ed.) Oral History and Photography, for Photography and Culture, 7:3, November 2014, pp. 337-340
  • Book review of Jonas Larsen and Mette Sandbye, Digital Snaps, for Source: The Photographic Review 79, 2014
  • Book review of Catherine Zuromskis, Snapshot Photography: The Lives of Images, for Times Educational Supplement, 5 December 2013 http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/books/snapshot-photography-the-lives-of-images-by-catherine-zuromskis/2009486.article  
  • Book review of James Hinton, The Mass Observers: A History 1937-1949, forCercles: Revue Pluridisciplinaire du Monde Anglophone, 2013 http://www.cercles.com/review/r69/Hinton.html 
  • 'Scientific Imaging', review of Josh Ellenbogen, Reasoned and Unreasoned Images for Source: The Photographic Review 76, 2013
  • 'Ordinary and Everywhere', Book review of Martin Hand, Ubiquitous Photography, for New Formations 79, 2013, pp. 159-161
  • 'Global Positioning Systems', review of Jane Tormey, Cities and Photography and 'Amuse-bouches', review of Mary Warner Marien, 100 Ideas that Changed Photography for Source: The Photographic Review 75, summer 2013
  • 'Back to Basics', review of Anna Fox and Natasha Caruana, Behind the Image and'Out of Eden', review of Alessandro Imbriaco, The Garden for Source: The Photographic Review 74,  2013
  • 'Film Photo Film', review of Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters for Source: The Photographic Review 73, 2012
  • 'Intimate Knowledge: The Postcard's Language of Love', University of Brighton Arts and Humanities Research and Postgraduate Studies Handbook, 2012, pp. 12-13 http://issuu.com/artsnews/docs/arts-postgrad-brighton
  • 'New Developments in Dress History: University of Brighton as an international centre of excellence', lead article (co-authored with Charlotte Nicklas) , University of Brighton Faculty of Arts Research News Summer 2012, Issue 29http://arts.brighton.ac.uk/__data/assets/pdf_file/0011/66728/faculty-of-arts-research-news-29.pdf
  • 'Plus ca Change...' book review of Risto Sarvas and David M. Frohlich, Snapshots to Social Media: The Changing Picture of Domestic Photography for New Formations 74, 2012, pp. 134-137
  • Book review of Clare Rose, Making, Wearing and Selling Boys' Clothes in Late Victorian England for Enterprise and Society 13: 1, March 2012, pp. 432-435
  • 'New Ways of Seeing, or: Old Hopes Revived' Reflections on Photographs as Discursive Documents, web content, Ph: The Postgraduate Photography Research Network, AHRC funded website, 2011 http://ph-research.co.uk/?p=686
  • 'Fun over Function: The vernacular photographic exhibition as wishing well, ghost train and curiosity shop', exhibition review, Ph: The Photography Research Network, AHRC funded website, 2011 http://ph-research.co.uk/?p=613
  • Book review of Gillian Rose, Doing Family Photography: The domestic, the public and the politics of sentiment for New Formations 71, 2011, pp. 140-141
  • 'English Anxieties', exhibition review, Mass Observation Bulletin, Issue 5, 2009
  • 'It is not art, but it is history: Domestic architecture and the interwar amateur photographer', Histories of Home Subject Specialist Network, 2008https://historiesofhomessn.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/annebella-pollen-summary.pdf

Talks, conference papers, seminar and workshop presentations

  • 'Edwardian Picture Postcards', public talk, The Keep, Brighton, 25 November 2015http://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/edwardian-picture-postcards-a-talk-by-dr-annebella-pollen-tickets-16534466033
  • Annebella Pollen in conversation with Erik Kessels, PhotoLondon, Somerset House, 21 May 2015 http://www.ticketmaster.co.uk/photo-london-talks-erik-kessels-in-london-21-05-2015/event/1F004E91DEA3A51D
  • 'More Modern than the Moderns: Performing Cultural Evolution in the Kibbo Kift Kindred', conference paper, Being Modern: Science and Culture in the Early 20th Century, Science Museum, 2015
  • Keynote speaker, The Role of Critical and Cultural Studies in Art School Education, Glasgow School of Art, 2015
  • 'Folk-Work-Place: Regional Romanticism and World Survey in the Kibbo Kift Kindred', conference paper, Recording Leisure Lives: Places and Spaces of Leisure in 20th Century Britain, Mass Observation Archive, 2015
  • 'For One Day Only: Multiple Perspectives on Everyday Life', public talk, ESRC Festival of Social Science, The Keep, Sussex, 2014
  • 'Familiar Constructs', panel discussion on family photographs, presentation and event chair, Brighton Photo Fringe, Phoenix Gallery, 2014 http://www.phoenixbrighton.org/bpf14-events-at-phoenix-brighton/ 
  • 'Symbolic Resistance in the Kibbo Kift Kindred: An otherworldly appeal in a war-torn world', conference paper, Design for War and Peace, Design History Society conference, University of Oxford, 2014
  • 'Utopian Futures and Imagined Pasts in the Ambivalent Modernity of the Kibbo Kift Kindred', conference paper, Utopias, European Network for Avant-Garde and Modernism Studies, University of Helsinki, Finland, 2014
  • 'The Shadow that Will Not Fade: The Silhouette's Decline and Revival 1860-2014', public lecture, Regency Town House, Hove, 2014
  • 'A Visual History of the Kindred of the Kibbo Kift / Vizualni Historie Mladeznicke Organizace The Kindred of the Kibbo Kift, invited talk and exhibition, Seventh International Woodcraft Gathering, Plana, Czech Republic, 2014
  • 'Silhouettes into the 21st Century: Revival and Reinterpretation', lecture, Southern Counties Costume Society study day, 2014
  • 'Back to Beginnings: Early woodcraft culture and its legacy in later Woodcraft Folk', workshop, lecture and exhibition, Back to Beginnings: London Region Woodcraft Folk camp, 2014
  • 'The Curated Ego: What makes a good selfie?', presentation and event chair, National Portrait Gallery panel discussion, 2014
  • 'Saying cheese for charity: Performing happiness in fundraising photographs', presentation at ESRC Festival of Social Science event, "What is Happiness?", The Quadrant, Brighton, 2013
  • 'Marketing Amateur Photography: Popular Circuits of Influence', conference paper, Professional Photography and Amateur Snapshots: Reconstructing Histories of Influence, Dialogue and Subversion, University of Nottingham, 2013
  • 'Prescriptive Aesthetics: Marketing Mass Photography at Boots the Chemist', conference paper, Workers and Consumers: The Photographic Industry, De Montfort University, 2013
  • 'Sandals from Fabians to Feminists: Walking your talk in protest footwear', conference paper, Radical Gestures: Designing Protest, Resistance and Refusal, University of the Arts, London, 2013
  • 'Silhouettes in the 21st Century', public talk, Silhouettes, Fashion and Image 1760-1960 Study Day, Regency Town House, Hove, 2013
  • 'Quaint terminology and outlandish costume: Tradition and modernity in the visual and material culture of the Kibbo Kift Kindred', conference paper,Alternative Modernisms, University of Cardiff, 2013
  • Either/And, Courtauld Institute of Art History seminar, discussion panel member with Charlotte Cotton and members of Ph: Photography Research Network, Courtauld Institute Research Forum, 2013
  • 'Beyond Making: Student practitioner perspectives on the benefits of Historical and Critical Studies', Design History Society panel: 'Design History in the Design Education Curriculum’, Design Research Society / Cumulus conference, Design Learning for Tomorrow - Design Education from Kindergarten to PhD, Oslo, Norway,2013
  • 'Socialist Sandals and Feminist Flats: Protest Footwear, Past and Present', conference paper, The World At Your Feet conference, Northampton Museum and Art Gallery / University of Northampton, 2013
  • 'Here comes everybody? Mass Participation Photography' invited speaker, Research Seminars in Cultures of Photography, Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, 2013
  • 'When is a cliche not a cliche? Reconsidering mass-produced sunsets', invited speaker, 100 Years of Photography at Newport symposium, University of Wales, Newport, 2012
  • 'Vernacular Photography', Book Club convener, The Photographers Gallery, London, 2012
  • 'Photography and the Other', Brighton Photo Biennial, Fabrica Gallery Tour, 2012
  • 'When is a photographic cliche not a cliche? Reconsidering mass-produced sunsets', conference paper, Reconsidering Amateur Photography, University of Brighton, 2012
  • 'Methodologies in Dialogue: Multiple perspectives on the use and interpretation of contemporary Mass Observation materials', conference paper, Mass Observation Anniversaries Conference, University of Sussex, 2012
  • 'Here Comes Everybody? Mass Participation Photography', invitedspeaker, Photography and Culture journal / The Photographers' Gallery 'Writing Photography' series, 2011
  • 'Visual economies of scale: Making sense of majority photography', invited speaker, Contemporary Vernacular Photographies, Birkbeck / The Photographers Gallery, London, 2011  http://archivingcultures.org/cvp/408
  • 'Naked Notes: Public/private intimate relations in Brighton picture postcard inscriptions', conference paper, Picture This: Postcards and Letters Beyond Text, University of Sussex, 2011  
  • 'Historians in two hundred years' time are going to die for that! Events and non-events in the Mass Observation Archive's 'One Day for Life' photography collection', seminar paper, Centre for Research in Memory, Narrative and Histories, University of Brighton, 2010
  • 'Mass Observation and the visual: The photography of everyday life', workshop presentation, Engaging Mass Observation: New Perspectives on Contemporary Material, Jubilee Library, Brighton, 2010
  • 'Performativity and affect in mass-participation photography', seminar paper, Ph: Postgraduate Photography Research Network, The Photographers Gallery, London, 2010 http://ph-research.co.uk/
  • 'Britain’s own family album: Participation, commemoration and the ‘intimate public’ of the One Day for Life photographic archive', conference paper, Private Eyes: Amateur Photography and Collective History Department of Art and Cultural Studies, University of Copenhagen, 2009http://privateeyes.ikk.ku.dk/programme/abstracts/pollen/
  • 'Without considering the merits of the photograph: Compassion, identity and memory beyond the frame of the image', conference paper, Materiality/Visuality: Reviewing Theory, Practice and Method, University of Durham / RIBA, 2009
  • 'A Fitting Memorial: History and memory in the One Day for Life photography archive', conference paper, Memories, Narratives, Histories, University of Sussex, 2009
  • 'The Book the Nation is Waiting for: One Day for Life', conference paper, The Photobook, Birkbeck, University of London, 2009
  • 'Picturing Identity and Making History: Mass-Participation Photography', participant, AHRC-funded workshop, Interdisciplinarity in the Archives, University of East Anglia, 2009
  • 'It is not art, but it is history: Domestic architecture and the interwar amateur photographer', invited speaker, Domestic Exposure: Exploring Photography At Home, Geffrye Museum, 2008
  • 'Mass Produced Dressing-up Costumes and the Commodification of Imagination', conference paper, Clothing Childhood, Pasold Foundation, Foundling Museum, 2008
  • 'Fifty thousand Britains: Mass Participation and Mass Observation', invited speaker, Research Seminars in the History, Theory and Practice of Photography, London College of Communication, 2008
  • 'Rooting Through the Collections with a One-Track Mind: Six Months as an Researcher/Interpreter for On the Pull', invited speaker, Audience Informed Programming: Study Day for Museum Professionals, Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, 2008 https://rpmcollections.files.wordpress.com/2014/09/on-the-pull-final-report.pdf
  • 'Love Letters and Hate Mail: Victorian Vinegar Valentines', public lecture, Old Courthouse Theatre, Brighton, 2008
  • 'Shadows and Forget-Me-Nots: Pictorialism and deathlessness in the amateur photography of Wilfred Sultan', invited speaker, Design History Research Seminar, University of Brighton, 2007
  • 'Seen with a Compound Eye: Polyfoto portraiture', conference paper, Hidden Histories: New Research in Design History and Material Culture, University of Brighton, 2007
  • 'A day unlike any other: In search of everyday photography in the One Day for Life photography collection', conference paper, Materialising Photography, Institute of Historical Research, 2007

Exhibitions, posters and other media

  • 'Researching Ourselves: Mass Observation as Reflexive Practice', research poster, University of Brighton Research Poster Competition, 2011http://www.flickr.com/photos/59986771@N06/5489138802/in/photostream
  • Keepers: Brighton and Hove Collectors, exhibitor, Brighton and Hove Council funded exhibition, The Basement, Brighton 15 -17 July 2011
  • 'Making sense of everyday life: Mass Observation as participatory research', exhibition, Brighton Festival Fringe, Jubilee Library, Brighton, 10 - 17 May 2010
  • University of Brighton Research Initatives: The Movie, featured researcher, 2009
  • 'Ordinary Photography? Mass participation and collective vision in the One Day for Life archive', research poster, University of Brighton Research Poster Competition, 2009 www.flickr.com/photos/brightonresearch/4184419423/
  • 'A Fitting Memorial: History and memory in the One Day for Life photography archive', research poster, Memories, Narratives, Histories, University of Sussex, 2009
  • On the Pull exhibition, Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, exhibition contributor,  14 February to 1 September 2008www.theargus.co.uk/news/1650563.postcards_that_tell_a_story/

Conference, study days and symposia organised

Editorial duties

Reviewing, chairing, committee and network membership 

  • 90 Years of the Woodcraft Folk (Heritage Lottery Fund project, £80,000), steering group, 2015-16
  • Peer and book reviewer for specialist and academic journals including Times Higher Education; Museum and Society; New Formations; Modernism/Modernity; Journal of Design History; Photographies; Photography and Culture; Gender, Place and Culture; Source: The Photographic Review; Cercles: Revue Pluridisciplinaire du Monde Anglophone; Enterprise and Culture; Convergence; Hospitality and Society
  • Manuscript reviewer for Bloomsbury
  • Executive Committee member, Trustee and Essay Prize Officer, Design History Society, 2012-2015
  • Ph: AHRC-funded Photography Research Network, 2010-present. Co-convenorhttp://ph-research.co.uk
  • Chairing duties: Familiar Constructs (Phoenix Gallery / Brighton Photo Fringe panel discussion, 2014), Design for War and Peace (Oxford University conference, 2014), The Curated Ego: What Makes a Good Selfie? (National Portrait Gallery event, 2014), Towards Global Histories of Design: Postcolonial Perspectives (National Institute of Design conference, India, 2013),Photography's Contested Spaces, Brighton Photo Biennial Symposium (University of Sussex, 2012), Mass Observation Anniversaries Conference (University of Sussex, 2012); Developing Dress History (University of Brighton conference, 2011); The Second World War, Popular Culture and Cultural Memory (University of Brighton conference, 2011)
  • Peer reviewer for Design History Society conferences, Design and the Spirit of Critical Utopianism, 2015, Design for War and Peace, 2014; Canterbury Christ Church / University of the Arts conference Nostalgias: Visualising Longing, 2013
  • Profiles of the Past: Silhouettes, Fashion and Image 1760-1960, joint University of Brighton / Regency Town House research project, member of organising team, 2013
  • The Photobook AHRC-funded workshop series, Universities of London and Kent, 2008-9. Invited member 
  • University of Brighton's Design History and Material Culture Research Group, steering group member
  • University of Brighton's Dress Research Collective, member
  • University of Brighton’s Postgraduate Design History Society: 75 members, established 2005, co-founder, annual symposium co-organiser and co-chair 2006-10, discussion list and website convenor

Grants, awards, selections and nominations

  • AHRC Fellowship (c.£165,000), 2015-17
  • AHRC workshop: Skills for Media Engagement, selected participant, 2014 http://skills4media.wordpress.com 
  • University of Brighton Alumni Award nominee, 2014
  • University of Brighton Research Initiatives sabbatical award winner (c.£12,000), 2013
  • University of Brighton Teaching Excellence Award nominee, 2013
  • University of Brighton Research Poster competition winner (£200 prize), 2011www.flickr.com/photos/59986771@N06/5489138802/
  • AHRC full-time three year Doctoral Award (c.£60,000), plus four further small AHRC grants for national and international research trips and conference presentation, 2007-10
  • Research Bursary (£5000), Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, 2007 

Professional affiliations

  • External Examiner for Design History, Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Sciences, Northumbria University, 2014-15
  • Design History Society, Trustee and Essay Prize Officer, 2012-15
  • Fellow of Higher Education Academy (FHEA), 2012-present
  • International Visual Sociology Association, member

Press coverage, citations and reviews

"Finding the paper in the journal Photography & Culture was a relief ... Frustratingly, aside from Annebella's work and Julia Gillen's Edwardian Postcard Project at Lancaster University, there has been a curious absence of academic attention given to correspondence by postcard." p. 45

"On my first reading of her paper, I only clocked the 'Researcher' half of the tag given to her by the Museum. But having met Annebella, it seems to me that just as crucial to her research were her instincts as an 'Interpreter'. Not for the analysis of the cards. This is as patient and dispassionate as you would expect a piece of academic work to be. Instead, what I mean is that her experience of collecting objects allowed her to make the most of access to the Museum's collections. She was alert to where the treasure may lie. As Walter Benjamin noted, collectors are at their core "interpreters of fate". They are people who develop skills to speculate about objects' pasts, to appreciate their worth. And Annebella certainly appreciates postcards." p. 46

Interview, Radio Reverb on the subject of Pollen's collection of photographic print envelopes as part of Keepers: Brighton and Hove Collectors, Brighton and Hove Council-funded exhibition, The Basement, Brighton 15 -17 July 2011: http://www.podcasts.com/melita_dennetts_podcast/episode/keepers_exhibition_at_the_basement_brighton

Selected invited external presentation

  • Keynote speaker, The Role of Critical and Cultural Studies in Art School Education, Glasgow School of Art, April 2015
  • 'The Curated Ego: What makes a good selfie?' chair of National Portrait Gallery event, January 2014 http://www.npg.org.uk/whatson/late-shift-1/panel-discussion-the-curated-ego-16012014.php
  • 'Saying cheese for charity: Performing happiness in fundraising photographs', presentation at ESRC Festival of Social Science event, What is Happiness?, The Quadrant, Brighton, 2013
  • Mass Observation symposium, The Photographer's Gallery, 2013, invited speaker
  • 'Research in the Twenty-first Century', invited member, discussion panel with Sally Tallant (CEO Liverpool Biennial), Donna Close (Brighton and Hove City Council, Arts and Cultural Projects manager), Dr. Frank Gray and Dr. Alan Boldon, University of Brighton Research Festival, 2013
  • Either And, History of Photography seminar, Courtauld Institute of Art, 2013, round table participant
  • World Footwear Conference, Northampton University, 2013, closing summary panel
  • 'Here comes everybody? Mass Participation Photography', seminar paper, Research Seminars in Cultures of Photography, Photographic History Research Centre, De Montfort University, 2013
  • 'When is a cliche not a cliche? Reconsidering mass-produced sunsets', seminar paper, 100 Years of Photography at Newport symposium, University of Wales, 2012
  • 'Photography and the Other', Brighton Photo Biennial, Tour, Fabrica Gallery, 2012
  • 'Vernacular Photography', Book Club, The Photographers Gallery, London, 2012
  • Visual economies of scale: Making sense of majority photography', seminar paper, Vernacular Photographies symposium, Birkbeck / The Photographers Gallery, London, 2011
  • Photographs as Textiles, invited lecture, Royal School of Needlework, 2011
  • 'Here Comes Everybody? Mass Participation Photography' public talk, The Photographers Gallery, Writing Photography series, 2011
  • 'Love Letters and Hate Mail: Victorian Vinegar Valentines', public talk, University of the Third Age, Farnham, 2010
  • 'Mass Market Photobooks', Invited lecture for MA Photography and the Book, University of Plymouth, 2010
  • 'Subcultural Style', Invited lecture for The London Look Summer School,University of Sussex, 2009 and 2010
  • 'Rooting Through the Collections with a One-Track Mind: Six Months as an Researcher/Interpreter for On the Pull', invited speaker, Audience Informed Programming: Study Day for Museum Professionals, Brighton Museum and Art Gallery, 2008
  • 'Love Letters and Hate Mail: Victorian Vinegar Valentines', public lecture, Old Courthouse Theatre, Brighton, 2008
  • 'Fifty thousand Britains: Mass participation and Mass Observation, seminar paper,Research Seminars in the History, Theory and Practice of Photography, London College of Communication, 2008
  • 'It is not art, but it is history: Domestic architecture and the interwar amateur photographer', invited speaker, Domestic Exposures: Photography at Home, Geffrye Museum, 2008
  • 'A day unlike any other: In search of everyday photography', invited participant,Materialising Photography workshop, Institute of Historical Research, 2007

Teaching 

Annebella Pollen has taught since 2005 at the University of Brighton, both in the College of Arts and Humanities and also as Research Fellow in the School of Applied Social Science (2009-10).

In her current role as Principal Lecturer in the History of Art and Design, Annebella teaches across all levels of all degrees in the programme (BA hons. History of Art and Design; Visual Culture; History of Design; History of Decorative Arts and Crafts; Fashion and Dress History; Museum and Heritage Studies; MA History of Design and Material Culture).

As Director of Historical and Critical Studies for the College of Arts and Humanities, Annebella is responsible for overseeing history and theory teaching for 1000 students. Annebella's research into the relationship between studio and theory in design education received a Distinction in the PGCert in Teaching and Learning in Higher Education, has been circulated through international conference presentation and in print (in Design & Culture 7:1, 2015).

Annebella is a registered PhD supervisor, currently co-supervising two AHRC-funded students. She welcomes applications from prospective candidates with interests in popular image culture, histories of photography, the material culture of everyday life and practices of resistance in art, design and dress.

Annebella's teaching portfolio includes visiting lecturer posts on undergraduate and postgraduate programmes at the Universities of Kingston, Sussex, Plymouth and Southampton, as well as at the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court and the University of the Arts, London. In 2013, Annebella was nominated for a University of Brighton Teaching Excellence Award. She is External Examiner for Design History in the Faculty of Arts, Design and Social Science, Northumbria University, 2014-15.