Applied Ethics MA

Introduction

Illustration for applied ethics ma

 

  • There are seven distinct Applied Ethics degrees to choose from exploring applied ethics or ethics in relation to art and design, education, healthcare, media, medicine or politics. For further details see the tabs above
  • Students take four core modules to introduce the activity of philosophical thinking and prepare for the research project, followed by subject-specific modules taught by staff in the relevant area of the university. 
  • The research project, the culmination of the MA Applied Ethics at Brighton, consolidates the experiences, practices, and research skills developed on the course into an extended argument.
  • Run through the Centre for Applied Philosophy, Politics and Ethics, one year full-time and two year part-time options are available. Individual modules can also be taken as a professional development course or as a ‘taster’ of what the full MA degree involves.

MA Applied Ethics - Details

Questions of ethics have come to the fore of late in a broad range of professions and academic subject areas. There have of course been longstanding concerns with ethical standards and practices in a number of ‘old’ professions, signally in law and medicine, where they have often been part of the regulatory framework of Professional and Statutory bodies. More recently, however, questions of ethics and ethical practice(s) have become of substantial concern both to practitioners in a wide variety of fields (e.g. engineering ethics, research ethics) and to professional and academic researchers and scholars. Thus there are now academic journals devoted to the ethics of most professions; and philosophy and ethics as academic fields are increasingly concerned with application and practice.

This Masters Programme draws on a number of areas of the University’s provision to identify and address ethical concerns in a variety of fields. On top of the core modules each pathway offers options designed for a specific disclipline and these taught elements lead to the culminating MA research project.  Since students on the Programme will have differing professional and/or occupational experiences, you will benefit from being members of an interdisciplinary cohort who will have come to the Programme on the basis of a variety of intellectual trajectories. In the core modules, there will be a mix of “professional/occupational” and “academic” interests.

No previous familiarity with philosophy is assumed: the first two core units, which students on all the degrees take together, are designed to introduce students to the activity of philosophical thinking. Two further core units, again taken by everyone, prepare students for their research project. All MA students thus take four Core Modules:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
  • Moral Thought & Practice
  • Research Methods
  • Research Ethics

You then take two optional modules, depending on the named award you are seeking. Details of these can be found through clicking the tabs above.

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Key facts

UCAS code

Duration Help

Full-time: 1 year

Part-time: 2 years

Typical entry requirements Help
individual offers may vary

Location Help Grand Parade

For non-native speakers of English:
IELTS 7.0 overall and 6.5 in writing.

Degree and/or experience:
Normally an undergraduate degree or equivalent. Appropriate accredited modules completed as part of other masters degrees, or their recognised equivalent, are taken into consideration.

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Fees

The fees listed here are for full-time courses for the upcoming academic year only. Further fees are payable for subsequent years of study.

The tuition fee you have to pay depends on a number of factors including the kind of course you take, whether you study full- or part-time and whether or not you already have a higher education qualification. If you are studying part-time you will normally be charged on a pro rata basis depending on the number of modules you take. Different rules apply to research degrees - contact the course team for up-to-date information.

Visit www.brighton.ac.uk/money for more information, including advice on international and island fee paying status, and the government's Equivalent or Lower Qualification (ELQ) policy.

UK/EU (FT) - 5,580 GBP

Island Students (FT) - 5,580 GBP

International (FT) - 13,840 GBP

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Art Design

Applied Ethics: Art and Design Ethics University of Brighton

Our MA Art and Design Ethics is suitable for students with no background in philosophy. The first two core units, which students on all the degrees take together, are designed to introduce students to the activity of philosophical thinking. Two further core units, again taken by everyone, prepare students for their research project.

The ethics module options designed for the MA Art and Design Ethics are: 

The ethics of practice:

  • Contemporary art practice: shock values
  • Contemporary art practice; political interventions
  • New media and the question of copyright
  • Design ethics: sustainability and social responsibility
  • Curating: issues of ownership and appropriation Artist/Designer/Curator in local/glogal contexts

 

Ethics of research in art and design practice

  • Ethics of Representation:practices of looking/theories of knowing
  • Photography from the newspaper to the gallery
  • Exhibiting artefacts and bodies
  • The ‘other’: body and culture
  • Issues of (dis)ability

 

You will also take the Core Modules alongside MA Applied Ethics students with other specialities. The Core Modules are:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
  • Moral Thought & Practice
  • Research Methods
  • Research Ethics

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Media

Applied Ethics: Media Ethics University of Brighton

What are the ethical issues that inform the field of creative media and media research?

The MA in Media Ethics will introduce you to the core concerns of ethics, before exploring the ethical implications of creative and professional media practice and media research. It is designed both for professionals wishing to gain a qualification in ethical aspects of their field and for students interested in pursuing further research.

These degrees develop your critical and analytical understanding of ethical issues, drawing on sound philosophical argument, while applying these skills in the specialist field.

The first two core units, which students on all the degrees take together, are designed to introduce students to the activity of philosophical thinking. Two further core units, again taken by everyone, prepare students for their research project.

The ethics module options designed for the MA Media Ethics are:

Media Ethics

  • The definition of the scope of media ethics as a branch of applied ethics and social philosophy; the idea of moralobligation
  • Analysis of the liberal tradition of freedom of thought andexpression and the current relevance, e. g. thearguments of John Stuart Mill, and contemporary critique of liberalism; two concepts of liberty
  • The ethics of government and the media: confidentiality and sources, ‘the right to know’, war reporting
  • Censorship – taste, decency and pornography, filmcensorship, broadcasting and the ‘new’ media
  • Privacy; defining the public and private; privacy and ‘celebrity culture’ – ‘big brother’ revisited
  • Truth and truth-telling – lying and moral choice in mediapractice; accuracy, fairness and bias
  • The ethics of globalization and media imperialism;ownership, control and representation
  • Values and professionalism – councils, codes and conduct, conflicts of interest



Practicing Media Research:

Research methods can appear a dry topic for discussion. However, this module demonstrates how particular methods are deployed in actual projects. Practitioners show how particular methods have been used throughout their career, modelling strategies and approaches for students to include oral interviewing, oral history and unobtrusive research methods such as working the archive.

 

You will also take the Core Modules alongside MA Applied Ethics students with other specialities.

The Core Modules are:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
  • Moral Thought & Practice
  • Research Methods
  • Research Ethics

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Medical

Applied Ethics: Medical and Healthcare Ethics University of Brighton

What are the ethical issues that inform medical and healthcare practice? How do legal frameworks and social contexts impact upon medical practices? Should medicine be viewed as an art or a science?

The MA in Medical Ethics and the MA in Healthcare Ethics each introduce students to the core concerns of ethics, before exploring the ethical implications of medical or healthcare practice. It is designed both for professionals wishing to gain a qualification in ethical aspects of their field and for students interested in pursuing further research.

These degrees develop your critical and analytical understanding of ethical issues, drawing on sound philosophical argument, while applying these skills in the specialist field of medical practice.

Healthcare Ethics

The Idea of Caring:

  • Caring
  • Feminist ethics
  • Advocacy and autonomy
  • The client/health professional relationship
  • Inter-professional and inter-disciplinary relationships
  • Duties, rights and responsibilities
  • Beneficence and non-malfeasance
  • TruthDignity and privacy
  • Virtue theories.

Healthcare Ethics/Medical Ethics

Legal Perspectives on Health:

  • English legal systems and methods – scope, source andtypes of law
  • How to study law – searching and utilising legal sources:primary, secondary, European and comparative law
  • The relationship of law and ethics
  • Human right and responsibilities
  • Right, equality and diversity in health service
  • Accountability and professional regulation
  • Malpractice litigationInformed consent and capacity
  • Confidentiality and disclosureIssues of metal health, children and young people
  • End of life, human tissue regulation, as relevant tolearners

Medicine: Art or Science?:

  • Inductivism
  • Verification and falsifiability
  • Hermeneutics
  • Postmodernism
  • ‘The person’ as biological and normative entity
  • Conceptions of ‘health and illness’

The Social Context of Medical Practice:

  • Contemporary liberal and socialist conceptions of social justice: Rawls, Cohen, Pogge, Farmer, O’Neill
  • The foundations of the NHS in the UK: private and publicmedicine
  • The idea of a profession: professional codes, ethics andpractice
  • The idea of a patient: who becomes a patient and how;patients’ responsibilities
  • Global issues: resources, immigration and emigration
  • Distributive justice and medicine as a social good

 

You will also take the Core Modules alongside MA Applied Ethics students with other specialities.

The Core Modules are:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
  • Moral Thought & Practice
  • Research Methods
  • Research Ethics

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Education

Applied Ethics: Education Ethics University of Brighton

Our course in MA Education Ethics offers a practical and useful qualification in the theory and application of ethics of education. It is suitable for students with no prior background in philosophical study and includes specially designed module options and a dissertation project on issues of your choice.

The ethics module options designed for the MA Education Ethics are Children and Students and Ethical Issues in Educational Research:

Children and Students:

  • Personal relationships:
  • Consent by children
  • Children’s rights
  • Teacher’s responsibilities
  • Notion of competence

Academic values

  • Intellectual property rights
  • Plagiarism and collusion
  • Bias, indoctrination, control of curriculum content

Confidentiality

  • The ethics and ideology of educational management in education
  • Confidentiality of meetings
  • Analysis of the language of managers
  • Tension between intellectual life and the satisfaction of targets
  • The perception of persons as ‘human resources’
Teachers and students:
  • Issues of power
  • Consensual relationships

Assessment and competition:

  • The uses and misuses of records of achievement

Ethical Issues in Educational Research:

  • Information and consent
  • Consent by children
  • Gatekeepers in schools
  • Privacy
  • Confidentiality
  • Participants as surrogates
  • Insider research
  • Costs and benefits: the justification of educational research
  • Children and students as research participants
  • Inspection data sponsor control and intellectual freedom
  • Ownership of data
  • The public right to know and the voluntariness of participation

You will also take the Core Modules alongside MA Applied Ethics students with other specialities. The Core Modules are:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
  • Moral Thought & Practice
  • Research Methods
  • Research Ethics

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Politics

Applied Ethics: Politics and Ethics University of Brighton

Our MA Politics and Ethics is suitable for students with no background in philosophy. The first two core units, which students on all the degrees take together, are designed to introduce students to the activity of philosophical thinking. Two further core units, again taken by everyone, prepare students for their research project.

The ethics module options designed for the MA Art and Design Ethics are: 

Global Ethics:

  • The philosophical foundation of global human rights
  • The politics of difference and multiculturalism
  • Liberalism and cosmopolitanism
  • Ethical and political debates about immigration
  • Humanitarian intervention
  • Multi-national corporations and the global division of labour
  • Environmental ethics and future generations
  • Capitalism, justice and poverty
  • The war on terror

The Politics of Applied Ethics:

  • A brief contemporary history of ‘applied ethics’
  • Aristotle on ethics and politics
  • Marx and Engels on politics and ethics
  • Moral and political justification
  • Analysis of the implications of these for business ethics, funding of research, ethical foreign policy and other relevant issues

You will also take the Core Modules alongside MA Applied Ethics students with other specialities.

The Core Modules are:

  • Introduction to Philosophical Thinking
  • Moral Thought & Practice
  • Research Methods
  • Research Ethics

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